Toxicity of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides to the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276577
Title:
Toxicity of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides to the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)
Author:
Taylor, Kevin Stuart, 1958-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) were exposed to six pyrethroid insecticides using four application techniques. Toxicities of the insecticides were compared. Results of topical and contact tests placed the six pyrethroids in one of three categories based on their relative toxicity to honey bees; highly toxic (cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, and permethrin), moderately toxic (flucythrinate and fenvalerate), and non-toxic (fluvalinate). The residue tests, by contrast, simulated field conditions by using sprayed cotton leaves for exposure. This test showed that both compound and formulation played an important role in determining toxicity. The conditioning test combined some of the previously used techniques and refined them into a test for detecting behavioral changes to bees following sublethal exposure to pesticides. Insecticide-treated honey bees had a lower learning curve than their respective control group. This indicates that, although bees may survive poisoning from pesticides, certain physiological functions are affected.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Pyrethroids.; Honeybee.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Entomology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waller, Gordon D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleToxicity of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides to the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.)en_US
dc.creatorTaylor, Kevin Stuart, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Kevin Stuart, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHoney bees (Apis mellifera L.) were exposed to six pyrethroid insecticides using four application techniques. Toxicities of the insecticides were compared. Results of topical and contact tests placed the six pyrethroids in one of three categories based on their relative toxicity to honey bees; highly toxic (cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, and permethrin), moderately toxic (flucythrinate and fenvalerate), and non-toxic (fluvalinate). The residue tests, by contrast, simulated field conditions by using sprayed cotton leaves for exposure. This test showed that both compound and formulation played an important role in determining toxicity. The conditioning test combined some of the previously used techniques and refined them into a test for detecting behavioral changes to bees following sublethal exposure to pesticides. Insecticide-treated honey bees had a lower learning curve than their respective control group. This indicates that, although bees may survive poisoning from pesticides, certain physiological functions are affected.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPyrethroids.en_US
dc.subjectHoneybee.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaller, Gordon D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332426en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19772423en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18384705en_US
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