Effects of prescribed burning on breeding birds in a ponderosa pine forest, southeastern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276570
Title:
Effects of prescribed burning on breeding birds in a ponderosa pine forest, southeastern Arizona
Author:
Horton, Scott Patterson, 1951-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A moderately intense, broadcast, understory, prescribed burn in 3 previously unburned ponderosa pine stands in southeastern Arizona felled or consumed 50% of all ponderosa pine snags ≥ 15 cm dbh. Large moderately decayed snags were most susceptible to burning. Large snags in the early stages of decay were preferred as nest sites by cavity-nesting birds. Numbers of live woody plants were reduced by 40%, mortality was greatest among shrubs and small trees. Canopy volume was reduced by 19%, the greatest impact was below 5 m. No species of cavity-nesting birds, or birds that associated with understory vegetation disappeared in the first season after burning, but 3 species decreased, and 1 species increased in abundance. The minor impacts of a single treatment with broadcast understory burning on bird populations will be ephemeral, but a repeated burns could have greater, and more lasting effects on the avian community.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Prescribed burning -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.; Forest birds -- Habitat -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.; Ponderosa pine -- Ecology.; Forests and forestry -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of prescribed burning on breeding birds in a ponderosa pine forest, southeastern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorHorton, Scott Patterson, 1951-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHorton, Scott Patterson, 1951-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA moderately intense, broadcast, understory, prescribed burn in 3 previously unburned ponderosa pine stands in southeastern Arizona felled or consumed 50% of all ponderosa pine snags ≥ 15 cm dbh. Large moderately decayed snags were most susceptible to burning. Large snags in the early stages of decay were preferred as nest sites by cavity-nesting birds. Numbers of live woody plants were reduced by 40%, mortality was greatest among shrubs and small trees. Canopy volume was reduced by 19%, the greatest impact was below 5 m. No species of cavity-nesting birds, or birds that associated with understory vegetation disappeared in the first season after burning, but 3 species decreased, and 1 species increased in abundance. The minor impacts of a single treatment with broadcast understory burning on bird populations will be ephemeral, but a repeated burns could have greater, and more lasting effects on the avian community.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPrescribed burning -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
dc.subjectForest birds -- Habitat -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
dc.subjectPonderosa pine -- Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectForests and forestry -- Arizona -- Santa Catalina Mountains.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332417en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19534500en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16796780en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16796779en_US
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