THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL SUPPORT AND ROLE STRAIN AND PREVENTATIVE HEALTH BEHAVIORS IN CRITICAL CARE NURSES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276557
Title:
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL SUPPORT AND ROLE STRAIN AND PREVENTATIVE HEALTH BEHAVIORS IN CRITICAL CARE NURSES
Author:
Whitney, Stuart Luhn
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the research was to describe the relationships between social support and role strain and preventative health behaviors. The sample consisted of 62 critical care nurses employed in three southwest acute care facilities. Subjects completed instruments measuring social support, role strain, and four preventative health care behaviors. Pearson correlations revealed significant positive relationships between social support and personal/household roles women perform and ways women handle stress. Additional significant negative relationships existed between marital/relationship roles women perform and leisure physical activities, a subset of preventative health behaviors. The parental roles, obligations, and responsibilities women perform were also significantly related with leisure physical activities. Conclusions drawn indicate that the critical care nurses did not perceive themselves susceptible to cardiovascular disease and therefore did not participate in preventative health care activities, regardless of perceived helpful social support and an absence of role strain.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Coronary heart disease -- Prevention.; Health attitudes.; Intensive care nursing -- Health and hygiene.; Intensive care nursing -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL SUPPORT AND ROLE STRAIN AND PREVENTATIVE HEALTH BEHAVIORS IN CRITICAL CARE NURSESen_US
dc.creatorWhitney, Stuart Luhnen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitney, Stuart Luhnen_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the research was to describe the relationships between social support and role strain and preventative health behaviors. The sample consisted of 62 critical care nurses employed in three southwest acute care facilities. Subjects completed instruments measuring social support, role strain, and four preventative health care behaviors. Pearson correlations revealed significant positive relationships between social support and personal/household roles women perform and ways women handle stress. Additional significant negative relationships existed between marital/relationship roles women perform and leisure physical activities, a subset of preventative health behaviors. The parental roles, obligations, and responsibilities women perform were also significantly related with leisure physical activities. Conclusions drawn indicate that the critical care nurses did not perceive themselves susceptible to cardiovascular disease and therefore did not participate in preventative health care activities, regardless of perceived helpful social support and an absence of role strain.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCoronary heart disease -- Prevention.en_US
dc.subjectHealth attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectIntensive care nursing -- Health and hygiene.en_US
dc.subjectIntensive care nursing -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332247en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18618030en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16600617en_US
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