EFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON THE RECRUITMENT ORDER OF MOTOR UNITS IN MAN: INDIRECT EXAMINATION BY ELECTRICALLY EVOKED MUSCLE RESPONSES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276555
Title:
EFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON THE RECRUITMENT ORDER OF MOTOR UNITS IN MAN: INDIRECT EXAMINATION BY ELECTRICALLY EVOKED MUSCLE RESPONSES
Author:
Trimble, Mark Herbert, 1958-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although the neural mechanisms responsible for the orderly recruitment of motor units have been investigated extensively, the flexibility of the underlying neural circuitry remains unclear. For example, the effects of electrical stimulation on the recruitment order of motor units is not well understood. This project was designed to study the recruitment order of motor units in man during different stimulation protocols. Examination of the compound-twitch characteristics of electrically evoked responses allowed an indirect determination of motor-unit recruitment order. The results demonstrate that the recruitment order of quadriceps femoris and triceps surae motor units differs according to the stimulation protocols used. Analysis of the compound-twitch characteristics indicated that the recruitment order of motor units during Hoffmann reflexes is similar to that of volitional muscle contractions but effectively the reverse of that during direct-motor responses. Moreover, the results suggest that cutaneous-afferent stimulation alters the recruitment thresholds of different motor unit types during the Hoffman reflex.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Muscle contraction -- Testing.; Neuromuscular transmission.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Exercise and Sport Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON THE RECRUITMENT ORDER OF MOTOR UNITS IN MAN: INDIRECT EXAMINATION BY ELECTRICALLY EVOKED MUSCLE RESPONSESen_US
dc.creatorTrimble, Mark Herbert, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTrimble, Mark Herbert, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough the neural mechanisms responsible for the orderly recruitment of motor units have been investigated extensively, the flexibility of the underlying neural circuitry remains unclear. For example, the effects of electrical stimulation on the recruitment order of motor units is not well understood. This project was designed to study the recruitment order of motor units in man during different stimulation protocols. Examination of the compound-twitch characteristics of electrically evoked responses allowed an indirect determination of motor-unit recruitment order. The results demonstrate that the recruitment order of quadriceps femoris and triceps surae motor units differs according to the stimulation protocols used. Analysis of the compound-twitch characteristics indicated that the recruitment order of motor units during Hoffmann reflexes is similar to that of volitional muscle contractions but effectively the reverse of that during direct-motor responses. Moreover, the results suggest that cutaneous-afferent stimulation alters the recruitment thresholds of different motor unit types during the Hoffman reflex.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMuscle contraction -- Testing.en_US
dc.subjectNeuromuscular transmission.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineExercise and Sport Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332245en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18152721en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16482347en_US
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