Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276525
Title:
INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
Author:
Brew, Tasha Marie, 1961-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to assess the adoption response of cotton growers to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, identify the extension strategies used to promote IPM, and provide descriptive comparison of IPM programs between the foremost eleven cotton-producing states in the United States. Integrated pest management is presented as an alternative agricultural production strategy referred to as sustainable agriculture. IPM programs for cotton were evaluated by use of a survey instrument and telephone interviews with the IPM coordinators for the eleven cotton-producing states. The most significant findings were that programs vary considerably between states; the most widely employed IPM techniques were selective use of chemicals, use of economic thresholds and sampling for pests; the Cooperative Extension Service worked closely with private consultants and grower associations; and adoption of a wide variety of IPM techniques has been extensive for cotton producers in the eleven foremost cotton-producing states.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agricultural pests -- Integrated control -- United States.; Cotton -- Diseases and pests -- Integrated control -- United States.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS IN COOPERATIVE EXTENSIONen_US
dc.creatorBrew, Tasha Marie, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrew, Tasha Marie, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess the adoption response of cotton growers to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programs, identify the extension strategies used to promote IPM, and provide descriptive comparison of IPM programs between the foremost eleven cotton-producing states in the United States. Integrated pest management is presented as an alternative agricultural production strategy referred to as sustainable agriculture. IPM programs for cotton were evaluated by use of a survey instrument and telephone interviews with the IPM coordinators for the eleven cotton-producing states. The most significant findings were that programs vary considerably between states; the most widely employed IPM techniques were selective use of chemicals, use of economic thresholds and sampling for pests; the Cooperative Extension Service worked closely with private consultants and grower associations; and adoption of a wide variety of IPM techniques has been extensive for cotton producers in the eleven foremost cotton-producing states.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgricultural pests -- Integrated control -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Diseases and pests -- Integrated control -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1332151en_US
dc.identifier.oclc19905636en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1687660xen_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16876593en_US
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