THE EFFECTS OF FIRE AND SUBSEQUENT DEFOLIATION ON ERAGROSTIS LEHMANNIANA (NEES) TILLER DEMOGRAPHY AND AERIAL BIOMASS ALLOCATION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276507
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF FIRE AND SUBSEQUENT DEFOLIATION ON ERAGROSTIS LEHMANNIANA (NEES) TILLER DEMOGRAPHY AND AERIAL BIOMASS ALLOCATION
Author:
Obermiller, Craig William, 1958-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Tiller recruitment, survival, growth and reproductive effort were monitored in a highly competitive bunchgrass to contrast the demographic effects of nonuse and dormant season burning with and without subsequent defoliation. The number of tillers recruited were largest during the fall, decreased through the winter and spring, and were smallest during the summer. Tiller mortality was highest during the summer, tillers surviving until fall usually completed senescence the following spring. Biomass accumulation and reproductive effort predominantly occurred during the summer rainfall season. Summer growth and reproduction began earlier and were enhanced by dormant season burning. Defoliation increased summer tiller recruitment and advanced by one month fall tiller recruitment. The wide range of tiller weight-density relationships which occurred among treatments followed the -3/2 Power Law. This species' competitiveness and ability to tolerate grazing is attributable to its ability to respond with plasticity along the -3/2 self-thinning line.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Lehmann lovegrass.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF FIRE AND SUBSEQUENT DEFOLIATION ON ERAGROSTIS LEHMANNIANA (NEES) TILLER DEMOGRAPHY AND AERIAL BIOMASS ALLOCATIONen_US
dc.creatorObermiller, Craig William, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorObermiller, Craig William, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTiller recruitment, survival, growth and reproductive effort were monitored in a highly competitive bunchgrass to contrast the demographic effects of nonuse and dormant season burning with and without subsequent defoliation. The number of tillers recruited were largest during the fall, decreased through the winter and spring, and were smallest during the summer. Tiller mortality was highest during the summer, tillers surviving until fall usually completed senescence the following spring. Biomass accumulation and reproductive effort predominantly occurred during the summer rainfall season. Summer growth and reproduction began earlier and were enhanced by dormant season burning. Defoliation increased summer tiller recruitment and advanced by one month fall tiller recruitment. The wide range of tiller weight-density relationships which occurred among treatments followed the -3/2 Power Law. This species' competitiveness and ability to tolerate grazing is attributable to its ability to respond with plasticity along the -3/2 self-thinning line.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLehmann lovegrass.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331463en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17497303en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16311735en_US
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