THE PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STRESS ON CAREGIVERS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE VICTIMS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276489
Title:
THE PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STRESS ON CAREGIVERS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE VICTIMS
Author:
Brown, Sharon Danielle
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis focused on the physiological impact of uncertainty on caregivers of Alzheimer's disease victims. A convenience sample of 30 subjects was used. The uncertainty level was assessed using Parent's Perception of Uncertainty in Illness Scale. Physiological arousal was determined by assaying urinary cortisol and catecholamine levels. The results of the study showed that uncertainty and physiological stress were inversely related. This led to the conclusion that uncertainty was beneficial in that it offered a degree of hope. Knowledge of the disease process increased the stress perceived due to the devastation of Alzheimer's disease and its incurable state. Younger individuals had higher physiological stress than older individuals for comparable amounts of uncertainty. Multiple reasons for this finding are postulated. They include the thought that the younger caregivers may fear developing the disease. It also may be that younger individuals need certainty about the future.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Alzheimer's disease -- Psychological aspects.; Stress (Physiology); Uncertainty.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF STRESS ON CAREGIVERS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE VICTIMSen_US
dc.creatorBrown, Sharon Danielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sharon Danielleen_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis focused on the physiological impact of uncertainty on caregivers of Alzheimer's disease victims. A convenience sample of 30 subjects was used. The uncertainty level was assessed using Parent's Perception of Uncertainty in Illness Scale. Physiological arousal was determined by assaying urinary cortisol and catecholamine levels. The results of the study showed that uncertainty and physiological stress were inversely related. This led to the conclusion that uncertainty was beneficial in that it offered a degree of hope. Knowledge of the disease process increased the stress perceived due to the devastation of Alzheimer's disease and its incurable state. Younger individuals had higher physiological stress than older individuals for comparable amounts of uncertainty. Multiple reasons for this finding are postulated. They include the thought that the younger caregivers may fear developing the disease. It also may be that younger individuals need certainty about the future.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectStress (Physiology)en_US
dc.subjectUncertainty.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331443en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17556804en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16333871en_US
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