INFLUENCE TECHNIQUES OF CLINICAL DIETITIANS WHEN INTERACTING WITH PHYSICIANS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276483
Title:
INFLUENCE TECHNIQUES OF CLINICAL DIETITIANS WHEN INTERACTING WITH PHYSICIANS
Author:
Thomson, Cynthia, 1957-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A national study of clinical dietitians was undertaken to determine: (1) current clinical activities performed, (2) techniques used to influence physicians and (3) level of confidence for successfully influencing physicians in seven areas of practice. Questionnaires were received from 458 (77%) of the dietitians. Data indicate dietitians are less likely to participate on patient care teams and attend medical/surgical rounds, but more likely to check meal trays than their 1982 counterparts. Factor analysis of clinical activities revealed three postures: diet oriented, physician oriented and case oriented. Factor analysis of the influence techniques, identified five postures: block/threaten, ingratiation, coalitions, assertive and the most used posture, rationality. Multiple regression analysis found associations between age and education and the use of rationality and ingratiating postures and between age and the assertive posture. Frequency analysis of confidence levels found dietitians most confident influencing the physician in the area of food consistency modification and least confident in nutritional laboratory data.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dietitians -- Psychological aspects.; Health care teams.; Medical cooperation.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutrition and Food Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINFLUENCE TECHNIQUES OF CLINICAL DIETITIANS WHEN INTERACTING WITH PHYSICIANSen_US
dc.creatorThomson, Cynthia, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Cynthia, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA national study of clinical dietitians was undertaken to determine: (1) current clinical activities performed, (2) techniques used to influence physicians and (3) level of confidence for successfully influencing physicians in seven areas of practice. Questionnaires were received from 458 (77%) of the dietitians. Data indicate dietitians are less likely to participate on patient care teams and attend medical/surgical rounds, but more likely to check meal trays than their 1982 counterparts. Factor analysis of clinical activities revealed three postures: diet oriented, physician oriented and case oriented. Factor analysis of the influence techniques, identified five postures: block/threaten, ingratiation, coalitions, assertive and the most used posture, rationality. Multiple regression analysis found associations between age and education and the use of rationality and ingratiating postures and between age and the assertive posture. Frequency analysis of confidence levels found dietitians most confident influencing the physician in the area of food consistency modification and least confident in nutritional laboratory data.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDietitians -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectHealth care teams.en_US
dc.subjectMedical cooperation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition and Food Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331428en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17605470en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16341259en_US
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