Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276479
Title:
FORAMINIFERA AS A TEST OF HERITABILITY OF SPECIATION POTENTIAL
Author:
Rode, Sandra Lee, 1955-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
If species selection shapes the history of clades, we should be able to detect its impact within well-established monophyletic descent groups. We should find that high rates of speciation/extinction are heritable. Demonstrating that high speciation/extinction rates have not been transmitted along known lines of descent would prove that species selection had not played an important role with the descent group under study. I have screened speciation rates within the Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera for heritability. Neither modified parent-offspring tests nor rank concordance tests reveal inheritance of this trait.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Species.; Paleoecology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFORAMINIFERA AS A TEST OF HERITABILITY OF SPECIATION POTENTIALen_US
dc.creatorRode, Sandra Lee, 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRode, Sandra Lee, 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIf species selection shapes the history of clades, we should be able to detect its impact within well-established monophyletic descent groups. We should find that high rates of speciation/extinction are heritable. Demonstrating that high speciation/extinction rates have not been transmitted along known lines of descent would prove that species selection had not played an important role with the descent group under study. I have screened speciation rates within the Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera for heritability. Neither modified parent-offspring tests nor rank concordance tests reveal inheritance of this trait.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpecies.en_US
dc.subjectPaleoecology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331424en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17682344en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16364715en_US
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