CYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITIES AND THE PROGRESSION TO INVASION IN A375P HUMAN MELANOMA CELLS IN VITRO

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276462
Title:
CYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITIES AND THE PROGRESSION TO INVASION IN A375P HUMAN MELANOMA CELLS IN VITRO
Author:
Greeff, Christopher Whitney, 1961-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A study was undertaken to determine whether cytogenetic abnormalities can be identified in an invasive melanoma cell population that has been selected in vitro out of a larger cell population of low invasive potential. The selecting agent was a denuded human amniotic membrane situated within Mega-Membrane Invasion Culture System chambers. Invasive cells were collected, grown, and harvested for cytogenetic analysis. Metaphases of these cells were examined for chromosomal abnormalities and for evidence of gene amplification in the form of double minute chromosomes. Invasive cell lines evinced changes in their degree of aneuploidy which were not seen in parental control lines of the same passage number. Significant karyotypic abnormalities identified in invasive cell lines were an increased dosage of chromosome 7 and multiple 1q translocation marker chromosomes. Double minute chromosomes were found in up to 18% of invasive cell metaphases examined and in 3% of parental controls. The incidence of double minutes was found to decrease as a function of passage number.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cytogenetics.; Melanoma.; Melanocytes.; Cancer invasiveness.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology and Immunology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCYTOGENETIC ABNORMALITIES AND THE PROGRESSION TO INVASION IN A375P HUMAN MELANOMA CELLS IN VITROen_US
dc.creatorGreeff, Christopher Whitney, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGreeff, Christopher Whitney, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA study was undertaken to determine whether cytogenetic abnormalities can be identified in an invasive melanoma cell population that has been selected in vitro out of a larger cell population of low invasive potential. The selecting agent was a denuded human amniotic membrane situated within Mega-Membrane Invasion Culture System chambers. Invasive cells were collected, grown, and harvested for cytogenetic analysis. Metaphases of these cells were examined for chromosomal abnormalities and for evidence of gene amplification in the form of double minute chromosomes. Invasive cell lines evinced changes in their degree of aneuploidy which were not seen in parental control lines of the same passage number. Significant karyotypic abnormalities identified in invasive cell lines were an increased dosage of chromosome 7 and multiple 1q translocation marker chromosomes. Double minute chromosomes were found in up to 18% of invasive cell metaphases examined and in 3% of parental controls. The incidence of double minutes was found to decrease as a function of passage number.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCytogenetics.en_US
dc.subjectMelanoma.en_US
dc.subjectMelanocytes.en_US
dc.subjectCancer invasiveness.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331403en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18009065en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18371358en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.