RECEPTIVE ACQUISITION OF NOVEL VOCABULARY BY SPANISH-DOMINANT, BILINGUAL PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276450
Title:
RECEPTIVE ACQUISITION OF NOVEL VOCABULARY BY SPANISH-DOMINANT, BILINGUAL PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
Author:
Boies, Robert, 1955-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effectiveness of a bilingual and a monolingual treatment condition was compared in the receptive training of novel action words presented to two bilingual, Spanish-dominant, minority-language preschoolers. In the bilingual condition, one set of actions and referents was trained in Spanish (L1) followed by training in English (L2). In the monolingual condition, another set of actions and referents was trained in L2 alone. For one child, superior L2 learning occurred in the bilingual condition, results consonant with reports by Garcia (1983a) and by Oskarsson (1975). For the other child, unexpectedly, the monolingual condition resulted in superior L2 learning. Her findings suggest that the effect of preference to learn in L2 may result in behavior which runs counter to expectations of performance based on observed dominance. Generalization of receptive learning to expressive performance was also assessed. Both children performed at sufficient levels to indicate learning was generalized from reception to expression.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
English language -- Study and teaching -- Bilingual method.; English language -- Study and teaching -- Spanish speakers.; Bilingualism -- United States.; Second language acquisition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRECEPTIVE ACQUISITION OF NOVEL VOCABULARY BY SPANISH-DOMINANT, BILINGUAL PRESCHOOL CHILDRENen_US
dc.creatorBoies, Robert, 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoies, Robert, 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effectiveness of a bilingual and a monolingual treatment condition was compared in the receptive training of novel action words presented to two bilingual, Spanish-dominant, minority-language preschoolers. In the bilingual condition, one set of actions and referents was trained in Spanish (L1) followed by training in English (L2). In the monolingual condition, another set of actions and referents was trained in L2 alone. For one child, superior L2 learning occurred in the bilingual condition, results consonant with reports by Garcia (1983a) and by Oskarsson (1975). For the other child, unexpectedly, the monolingual condition resulted in superior L2 learning. Her findings suggest that the effect of preference to learn in L2 may result in behavior which runs counter to expectations of performance based on observed dominance. Generalization of receptive learning to expressive performance was also assessed. Both children performed at sufficient levels to indicate learning was generalized from reception to expression.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Study and teaching -- Bilingual method.en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Study and teaching -- Spanish speakers.en_US
dc.subjectBilingualism -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectSecond language acquisition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1331388en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18953239en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16678527en_US
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