SIMULATIONS OF SCANNED FOCUSSED ULTRASOUND HYPERTHERMIA: THE EFFECTS OF SCANNING SPEED, SCANNING PATTERN AND MULTIPLE TILTED TRANSDUCERS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276440
Title:
SIMULATIONS OF SCANNED FOCUSSED ULTRASOUND HYPERTHERMIA: THE EFFECTS OF SCANNING SPEED, SCANNING PATTERN AND MULTIPLE TILTED TRANSDUCERS
Author:
Moros, Eduardo Gerardo, 1960-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A transient three-dimensional simulation program was developed to study the effects of scanning speed, scanning pattern, blood perfusion, transducer choice and multiple tilted transducers with overlapping foci during scanned focussed ultrasound hyperthermia. The results showed that (1) the temperature fluctuations increase linearly with decreasing scanning speed, (2) the temperature fluctuations are a weak, increasingly exponential function of the blood perfusion rate, and (3) that the largest temperature fluctuation is always located at the acoustical focal depth on the scan path independently of focal plane depth. Simulations using multiple scan paths showed that relatively uniform average temperature distributions can be achieved at the focal zone as long as the spacing between the concentric scans was not greater than the diameter of the focus of the power field. Finally, the results showed that using multiple tilted transducers with overlapping foci, increased focussing can be obtained at the focal depth.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Fever therapy.; Cancer -- Treatment.; Ultrasonic waves -- Therapeutic use.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSIMULATIONS OF SCANNED FOCUSSED ULTRASOUND HYPERTHERMIA: THE EFFECTS OF SCANNING SPEED, SCANNING PATTERN AND MULTIPLE TILTED TRANSDUCERSen_US
dc.creatorMoros, Eduardo Gerardo, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMoros, Eduardo Gerardo, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA transient three-dimensional simulation program was developed to study the effects of scanning speed, scanning pattern, blood perfusion, transducer choice and multiple tilted transducers with overlapping foci during scanned focussed ultrasound hyperthermia. The results showed that (1) the temperature fluctuations increase linearly with decreasing scanning speed, (2) the temperature fluctuations are a weak, increasingly exponential function of the blood perfusion rate, and (3) that the largest temperature fluctuation is always located at the acoustical focal depth on the scan path independently of focal plane depth. Simulations using multiple scan paths showed that relatively uniform average temperature distributions can be achieved at the focal zone as long as the spacing between the concentric scans was not greater than the diameter of the focus of the power field. Finally, the results showed that using multiple tilted transducers with overlapping foci, increased focussing can be obtained at the focal depth.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFever therapy.en_US
dc.subjectCancer -- Treatment.en_US
dc.subjectUltrasonic waves -- Therapeutic use.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1330559en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17759068en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1637759xen_US
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