Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276433
Title:
AN EXAMINATION OF SEARCH ROUTINES USED IN SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSES
Author:
Gillett, Susan Gille, 1957-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Slope stability analyses are commonly performed using computer programs hich perform safety factor calculations using limit equilibrium solutions and search for the critical, or most probable failure surface. These searches are always performed using "direct search" techniques, which are the simplest but least efficient optimization methods. In the future, more advanced optimization algorithms will be incorporated into existing slope stability programs, which will greatly increase the speed with which the search converges to the critical slip surface. The relative efficiency and reliability of these new search strategies must be established by comparative testing on a variety of slope problems. This paper presents a set of problems that will serve as a basis for future comparative testing of different optimization procedures. These problems span the range of slope problems encountered by geotechnical engineers. Baseline measures of efficiency are obtained using an existing slope stability program with grid and pattern search capabilities.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Slopes (Soil mechanics) -- Stability -- Testing.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAN EXAMINATION OF SEARCH ROUTINES USED IN SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSESen_US
dc.creatorGillett, Susan Gille, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGillett, Susan Gille, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSlope stability analyses are commonly performed using computer programs hich perform safety factor calculations using limit equilibrium solutions and search for the critical, or most probable failure surface. These searches are always performed using "direct search" techniques, which are the simplest but least efficient optimization methods. In the future, more advanced optimization algorithms will be incorporated into existing slope stability programs, which will greatly increase the speed with which the search converges to the critical slip surface. The relative efficiency and reliability of these new search strategies must be established by comparative testing on a variety of slope problems. This paper presents a set of problems that will serve as a basis for future comparative testing of different optimization procedures. These problems span the range of slope problems encountered by geotechnical engineers. Baseline measures of efficiency are obtained using an existing slope stability program with grid and pattern search capabilities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSlopes (Soil mechanics) -- Stability -- Testing.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1330549en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17617921en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16343153en_US
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