THE IMPACT OF RELATIONSHIP TYPE, OTHER BENEFIT, LEADERSHIP STYLE AND GENDER ON MANAGERIAL INFLUENCE TACTICS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276428
Title:
THE IMPACT OF RELATIONSHIP TYPE, OTHER BENEFIT, LEADERSHIP STYLE AND GENDER ON MANAGERIAL INFLUENCE TACTICS
Author:
Birk, Thomas Spencer, 1958-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined situational and individual difference variables that impact message strategy selection in superior-subordinate influence attempts. The study predicted and found a significant interaction between other benefit and concern for people. The results indicate that employee-oriented subjects are more un willing to employ aggressive strategies when compliance does not benefit the target. In addition, the study predicted and found a significant interaction between the type of relationship between superior and subordinates and concern for task. Results obtained suggesting that task-oriented subjects use more aggressive strategies when attempting to gain compliance from employees in noninterpersonal relationships only. Females reported a greater degree of concern for people than males and more un willingness to employ verbally aggressive strategies. This supports the conclusion that females may be more empathic than males, resulting in an unwillingness to employ strategies that may be perceived as lacking in concern for other's feelings.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Compliance.; Communication in management.; Leadership.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF RELATIONSHIP TYPE, OTHER BENEFIT, LEADERSHIP STYLE AND GENDER ON MANAGERIAL INFLUENCE TACTICSen_US
dc.creatorBirk, Thomas Spencer, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBirk, Thomas Spencer, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined situational and individual difference variables that impact message strategy selection in superior-subordinate influence attempts. The study predicted and found a significant interaction between other benefit and concern for people. The results indicate that employee-oriented subjects are more un willing to employ aggressive strategies when compliance does not benefit the target. In addition, the study predicted and found a significant interaction between the type of relationship between superior and subordinates and concern for task. Results obtained suggesting that task-oriented subjects use more aggressive strategies when attempting to gain compliance from employees in noninterpersonal relationships only. Females reported a greater degree of concern for people than males and more un willingness to employ verbally aggressive strategies. This supports the conclusion that females may be more empathic than males, resulting in an unwillingness to employ strategies that may be perceived as lacking in concern for other's feelings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCompliance.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication in management.en_US
dc.subjectLeadership.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1330542en_US
dc.identifier.oclc18938661en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16673657en_US
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