THE SONORAN TOPMINNOW (POECILIOPSIS OCCIDENTALIS) AND THE MOSQUITOFISH (GAMBUSIA AFFINIS): A TEST OF EMIGRATORY BEHAVIOR

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276406
Title:
THE SONORAN TOPMINNOW (POECILIOPSIS OCCIDENTALIS) AND THE MOSQUITOFISH (GAMBUSIA AFFINIS): A TEST OF EMIGRATORY BEHAVIOR
Author:
Dean, Sheila Ann
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In experimental pools open to emigration, mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) resided at higher densities than topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). When Gambusia were introduced to Poeciliopsis pools, all topminnow maintained residency. Only 11% of the Gambusia emigrated from the mixed populations before the plant cover was removed; with no cover, 59% left. A significant number of Gambusia in single species pools also responded to a loss of cover by emigrating. Continuing residency of Poeciliopsis after introduction of Gambusia supports findings that displacement by mosquitofish is not an immediate process. Frayed fins on resident topminnow suggest short-term agonistic interactions. Coexistence of an exotic species (Gambusia) and an endangered desert fish (Poeciliopsis) may depend on the complexity, or spatial variation, of the Southwest's few remaining cienegas. The opportunity to disperse from pools in these habitats may be an important factor in Poeciliopsis survival; such emigratory behavior can be tested in open experimental systems.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Western mosquitofish; Gila topminnow.; Fishes -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE SONORAN TOPMINNOW (POECILIOPSIS OCCIDENTALIS) AND THE MOSQUITOFISH (GAMBUSIA AFFINIS): A TEST OF EMIGRATORY BEHAVIORen_US
dc.creatorDean, Sheila Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorDean, Sheila Annen_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn experimental pools open to emigration, mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) resided at higher densities than topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). When Gambusia were introduced to Poeciliopsis pools, all topminnow maintained residency. Only 11% of the Gambusia emigrated from the mixed populations before the plant cover was removed; with no cover, 59% left. A significant number of Gambusia in single species pools also responded to a loss of cover by emigrating. Continuing residency of Poeciliopsis after introduction of Gambusia supports findings that displacement by mosquitofish is not an immediate process. Frayed fins on resident topminnow suggest short-term agonistic interactions. Coexistence of an exotic species (Gambusia) and an endangered desert fish (Poeciliopsis) may depend on the complexity, or spatial variation, of the Southwest's few remaining cienegas. The opportunity to disperse from pools in these habitats may be an important factor in Poeciliopsis survival; such emigratory behavior can be tested in open experimental systems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWestern mosquitofishen_US
dc.subjectGila topminnow.en_US
dc.subjectFishes -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1330513en_US
dc.identifier.oclc17455338en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16302448en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16302394en_US
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