Persistence and Power: A Study of Native American Peoples in the Sonoran Desert and the Devers-Palo Verde High Voltage Transmission Line

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/276072
Title:
Persistence and Power: A Study of Native American Peoples in the Sonoran Desert and the Devers-Palo Verde High Voltage Transmission Line
Author:
Bean, Lowell John; Vane, Sylvia; Dobyns, Henry F.; Martin, M. Kay; Stoffle, Richard W.; White, David R. M.
Affiliation:
Cultural Systems Research, Inc.; University of Wisconsin-Parkside
Issue Date:
15-Sep-1978
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Cultural Systems Research, Inc.
Description:
In the late 1970s, Southern California Edison Company proposed the construction of a 500 Kilovolt transmission line from Buckeye, Arizona (just west of Phoenix) to the Devers substation near Banning California. The proposed routes crossed the traditional territory of numerous Native American groups such as the Cahuilla, Chemehuevi Southern Paiutes, Cocopah, Mojave, Maricopa, O’Odham, Quechan, and Yavapai. As required by the National Environmental Policy Act, an environmental impact assessment was conducted to understand potential impacts this project could have on human and natural resources. For the first time since the passage of NEPA, Native American concerns were fully considered. This report presents the findings of the first Native American social impact assessment in the United States. This report presents contemporary Native American values that were pertinent to planning, construction, operation, and maintenance of high voltage generation and transmission facilities. The ethnographic study also considered the following aspects: (a) determine if, where, and in what manner such values were relevant to the Devers Palo Verde study area, (b) define differing levels of significance that Native Americans assigned to geographical points, zones, or issues within the subject study area exhibiting such values, (c) assign appropriate sensitivity ratings to the pertinent points, zones, or issues of significance and rank such points, zones, and issues from highest to lowest, explain what actions might constitute varying degrees, kinds of impact to those points, zones, or issues, and (e) provide recommendations for mitigation of negative impacts to those points, zones, or issues.
Keywords:
Environmental Impact Assessment; National Environmental Policy Act; Social Impact Assessment; Southern Paiute; Mojave; Maricopa; Yavapai; Cocopah; Cahuilla; O'Odham; Quechan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePersistence and Power: A Study of Native American Peoples in the Sonoran Desert and the Devers-Palo Verde High Voltage Transmission Lineen_US
dc.contributor.authorBean, Lowell Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorVane, Sylviaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDobyns, Henry F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMartin, M. Kayen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, David R. M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCultural Systems Research, Inc.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Wisconsin-Parksideen_US
dc.date.issued1978-09-15-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherCultural Systems Research, Inc.en_US
dc.descriptionIn the late 1970s, Southern California Edison Company proposed the construction of a 500 Kilovolt transmission line from Buckeye, Arizona (just west of Phoenix) to the Devers substation near Banning California. The proposed routes crossed the traditional territory of numerous Native American groups such as the Cahuilla, Chemehuevi Southern Paiutes, Cocopah, Mojave, Maricopa, O’Odham, Quechan, and Yavapai. As required by the National Environmental Policy Act, an environmental impact assessment was conducted to understand potential impacts this project could have on human and natural resources. For the first time since the passage of NEPA, Native American concerns were fully considered. This report presents the findings of the first Native American social impact assessment in the United States. This report presents contemporary Native American values that were pertinent to planning, construction, operation, and maintenance of high voltage generation and transmission facilities. The ethnographic study also considered the following aspects: (a) determine if, where, and in what manner such values were relevant to the Devers Palo Verde study area, (b) define differing levels of significance that Native Americans assigned to geographical points, zones, or issues within the subject study area exhibiting such values, (c) assign appropriate sensitivity ratings to the pertinent points, zones, or issues of significance and rank such points, zones, and issues from highest to lowest, explain what actions might constitute varying degrees, kinds of impact to those points, zones, or issues, and (e) provide recommendations for mitigation of negative impacts to those points, zones, or issues.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subjectNational Environmental Policy Acten_US
dc.subjectSocial Impact Assessmenten_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectMojaveen_US
dc.subjectMaricopaen_US
dc.subjectYavapaien_US
dc.subjectCocopahen_US
dc.subjectCahuillaen_US
dc.subjectO'Odhamen_US
dc.subjectQuechanen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/276072-
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