Native Americans Respond to the Transportation of Low Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/273029
Title:
Native Americans Respond to the Transportation of Low Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site
Author:
Austin, Diane E.; Stoffle, Richard W.; Stewart, Sarah; Shamir, Eylon; Gardner, Andrew; Fish, Allyson; Barton, Karen
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
Sep-1998
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Description:
This study is about the impacts of the transportation of low level radioactive waste (LLRW) on American Indians. The terms American Indians, Native Americans, and Indians are used interchangeably throughout this report to refer to people who are members of tribes in the United States. The information contained in this report is valuable to non -Indian individuals, communities, and governments as well as to the tribes and the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) for which it was prepared. Many of the individuals who agreed to participate in this study asked if their non -Indian neighbors were also being given the opportunity to share their views and perspectives on the transportation of LLRW near and through their neighborhoods. Although this study was designed to include only Native Americans, it can serve as a model for additional studies in non –Indian communities. American Indian tribes have a unique status as sovereign nations within the U.S., and this study was designed to address that relationship.This study includes an assessment of social and cultural impacts. One type of impact assessment concerns the estimation and communication of risks associated with potentially dangerous technologies or substances. Such an assessment, a technological "risk assessment," is generally conducted by natural or physical scientists and focuses on the probability and magnitude of various scenarios through time (Wolfe 1988). The specialists who conduct the assessment believe their estimates reflect the "real risks" of a technology or project because the estimates were made using scientific calculations. This study is not a risk assessment. Instead, this study pays attention to the public perceptions of impacts and risks. Like other social scientists, the researchers and American Indian partners who designed and conducted this study focus on public perceptions and frame the discussions in terms of locally defined values and concerns.This study involves 29 tribes and subgroups and is therefore very complex. Every effort has been made to present information systematically to help the reader make sense of what is being presented. Information about the tribes is presented in the same order throughout the report.
Note:
This is one of two reports addressing this study.
Keywords:
Department of Energy; Nevada Test Site; Southern Paiute; Western Shoshone; Owens Valley Paiute; Goshute; Mojave; Hopi; Navajo; Radioactive Waste

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNative Americans Respond to the Transportation of Low Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Siteen_US
dc.contributor.authorAustin, Diane E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorShamir, Eylonen_US
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorFish, Allysonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1998-09-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.descriptionThis study is about the impacts of the transportation of low level radioactive waste (LLRW) on American Indians. The terms American Indians, Native Americans, and Indians are used interchangeably throughout this report to refer to people who are members of tribes in the United States. The information contained in this report is valuable to non -Indian individuals, communities, and governments as well as to the tribes and the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) for which it was prepared. Many of the individuals who agreed to participate in this study asked if their non -Indian neighbors were also being given the opportunity to share their views and perspectives on the transportation of LLRW near and through their neighborhoods. Although this study was designed to include only Native Americans, it can serve as a model for additional studies in non –Indian communities. American Indian tribes have a unique status as sovereign nations within the U.S., and this study was designed to address that relationship.This study includes an assessment of social and cultural impacts. One type of impact assessment concerns the estimation and communication of risks associated with potentially dangerous technologies or substances. Such an assessment, a technological "risk assessment," is generally conducted by natural or physical scientists and focuses on the probability and magnitude of various scenarios through time (Wolfe 1988). The specialists who conduct the assessment believe their estimates reflect the "real risks" of a technology or project because the estimates were made using scientific calculations. This study is not a risk assessment. Instead, this study pays attention to the public perceptions of impacts and risks. Like other social scientists, the researchers and American Indian partners who designed and conducted this study focus on public perceptions and frame the discussions in terms of locally defined values and concerns.This study involves 29 tribes and subgroups and is therefore very complex. Every effort has been made to present information systematically to help the reader make sense of what is being presented. Information about the tribes is presented in the same order throughout the report.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is one of two reports addressing this study.en_US
dc.subjectDepartment of Energyen_US
dc.subjectNevada Test Siteen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectWestern Shoshoneen_US
dc.subjectOwens Valley Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectGoshuteen_US
dc.subjectMojaveen_US
dc.subjectHopien_US
dc.subjectNavajoen_US
dc.subjectRadioactive Wasteen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/273029-
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