Computational Modeling to Reduce Impact of Heat Stress in Lactating Cows

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/272838
Title:
Computational Modeling to Reduce Impact of Heat Stress in Lactating Cows
Author:
Rojano Aguilar, Fernando
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Climatic conditions inside the dairy barn do not concern dairy farmers until those conditions begin to affect productivity and, consequently, profits. As heat and humidity increase beyond the cow's comfort levels, milk production declines, as does fertility and the welfare of the cow in general. To reinforce the cooling mechanisms currently used, this work proposes an alternative system for reducing the risk of heat stress. This innovative conductive cooling system does not depend on current weather conditions, and it does not require significant modifications when it is installed or during its operation. Also, the system circulates water that can be reused. Given that a review of the literature found very few related studies, it is suggested that each freestall be equipped with a viable prototype in the form of a waterbed able to exchange heat. Such a prototype has been simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and later verified by a set of experiments designed to confirm its cooling capacity. Furthermore, this investigation sets the foundation for modeling temperature in a water supply system linked to the waterbeds. EPANET, a software program developed by the Environmental Protection Agency, simulates the hydraulic model. Its Water Quality Solver has been modified according to an analogy in the governing equation that compares mass to heat transfer and serves to simulate water temperature as the water is transported from its source to the point of delivery and then as it returns to the same source.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Conductive cooling; Cooling systems; Dairy Cows; Heat stress; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering; Animal Housing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Choi, Christopher Y.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComputational Modeling to Reduce Impact of Heat Stress in Lactating Cowsen_US
dc.creatorRojano Aguilar, Fernandoen_US
dc.contributor.authorRojano Aguilar, Fernandoen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractClimatic conditions inside the dairy barn do not concern dairy farmers until those conditions begin to affect productivity and, consequently, profits. As heat and humidity increase beyond the cow's comfort levels, milk production declines, as does fertility and the welfare of the cow in general. To reinforce the cooling mechanisms currently used, this work proposes an alternative system for reducing the risk of heat stress. This innovative conductive cooling system does not depend on current weather conditions, and it does not require significant modifications when it is installed or during its operation. Also, the system circulates water that can be reused. Given that a review of the literature found very few related studies, it is suggested that each freestall be equipped with a viable prototype in the form of a waterbed able to exchange heat. Such a prototype has been simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and later verified by a set of experiments designed to confirm its cooling capacity. Furthermore, this investigation sets the foundation for modeling temperature in a water supply system linked to the waterbeds. EPANET, a software program developed by the Environmental Protection Agency, simulates the hydraulic model. Its Water Quality Solver has been modified according to an analogy in the governing equation that compares mass to heat transfer and serves to simulate water temperature as the water is transported from its source to the point of delivery and then as it returns to the same source.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectConductive coolingen_US
dc.subjectCooling systemsen_US
dc.subjectDairy Cowsen_US
dc.subjectHeat stressen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectAnimal Housingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural & Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKacira, Muraten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAn, Linglingen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChoi, Christopher Y.en_US
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