Spanish Historiography on the Question of Race, 1940s-2010: How Have Historians Approached Purity of Blood?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271939
Title:
Spanish Historiography on the Question of Race, 1940s-2010: How Have Historians Approached Purity of Blood?
Author:
Quintanilla, Fernando
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The concept of "purity of blood" in fifteenth and sixteenth century Iberia is one that has given rise to many historical interpretations throughout the decades. The way that race is conceptualized and understood by both the historians who interpret it, and by the society in which in functioned, has shaped the way in which modern historians have approached the study of race. Three significant contributions to the understanding of the idea of race within the Iberian Peninsula of the late medieval and early modern periods are those of Américo Castro, Henry Kamen and David Nirenberg. Each historian approaches race in a fundamentally distinct manner. While historians construct new ideas and ways of understanding the Iberian concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and race itself - in the past, it is evident that they wrestle with difficulties that are by no means unique, for scholarship continues to strive to add something new to the problem of classifying and identifying human groups, as is our sociological tendency.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpanish Historiography on the Question of Race, 1940s-2010: How Have Historians Approached Purity of Blood?en_US
dc.creatorQuintanilla, Fernandoen_US
dc.contributor.authorQuintanilla, Fernandoen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe concept of "purity of blood" in fifteenth and sixteenth century Iberia is one that has given rise to many historical interpretations throughout the decades. The way that race is conceptualized and understood by both the historians who interpret it, and by the society in which in functioned, has shaped the way in which modern historians have approached the study of race. Three significant contributions to the understanding of the idea of race within the Iberian Peninsula of the late medieval and early modern periods are those of Américo Castro, Henry Kamen and David Nirenberg. Each historian approaches race in a fundamentally distinct manner. While historians construct new ideas and ways of understanding the Iberian concept of limpieza de sangre (purity of blood) and race itself - in the past, it is evident that they wrestle with difficulties that are by no means unique, for scholarship continues to strive to add something new to the problem of classifying and identifying human groups, as is our sociological tendency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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