Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271924
Title:
Supplemental Lies
Author:
Redpath, Chelsi Monique Randi
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Thousands of companies claim their supplement can cleanse your body, boost your immune system, and make you skinny, but is what’s written on a bottle or website really true? Is there enough research and evidence behind their claims or are they just saying whatever it takes to get your money? By comparing product claims with research literature and online sources, the scientific efficacy of MacroMicro Cleanse, Immune 24/7, and HCG ads was assessed. It was found that many claims made by these manufacturers were false and/or had insufficient evidence to support them. My study also discusses the mechanisms by which the body maintains health, focusing particularly on the function of organs and the effect of exercise and diet. This combination was found to be significantly more effective than any of the supplements reviewed. Turn on your computer and search "supplements" for detox, immune function and weight loss, and you will see hundreds of ads pop up that explain they have the answers to your health problems but realistically, most of these claims are empty promises.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSupplemental Liesen_US
dc.creatorRedpath, Chelsi Monique Randien_US
dc.contributor.authorRedpath, Chelsi Monique Randien_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThousands of companies claim their supplement can cleanse your body, boost your immune system, and make you skinny, but is what’s written on a bottle or website really true? Is there enough research and evidence behind their claims or are they just saying whatever it takes to get your money? By comparing product claims with research literature and online sources, the scientific efficacy of MacroMicro Cleanse, Immune 24/7, and HCG ads was assessed. It was found that many claims made by these manufacturers were false and/or had insufficient evidence to support them. My study also discusses the mechanisms by which the body maintains health, focusing particularly on the function of organs and the effect of exercise and diet. This combination was found to be significantly more effective than any of the supplements reviewed. Turn on your computer and search "supplements" for detox, immune function and weight loss, and you will see hundreds of ads pop up that explain they have the answers to your health problems but realistically, most of these claims are empty promises.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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