The Misrepresentation and Underrepresentation of Women in U.S. Politics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271619
Title:
The Misrepresentation and Underrepresentation of Women in U.S. Politics
Author:
Nankervis, Rose Amber
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in United States politics are conditions that have existed for centuries. Women have been underrepresented because of the perceptions masculinism and gender hierarchy have created. These ideologies privilege men and masculine qualities, which puts women at a disadvantage. Research has shown that women are just as successful as men when running for office. Women, however, remain underrepresented primarily because they choose not to run. A few reasons why women choose not to run are that their roles as wives and mothers may interfere with their candidacies and they tend to have less money, fewer political contacts, and less appropriate employment histories. Aside from women choosing not to run, there are some other reasons why women are underrepresented in United States politics and these are referred to as barriers that need to be overcome. Some of these barriers are social and gendered stereotypes, incumbency, sex discrimination and the political system itself. These barriers pose a problem because they deter women from running for office and they keep the women who run from succeeding. Women have successfully weakened many of these barriers but there is still progress to be made in order for them to reach parity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Misrepresentation and Underrepresentation of Women in U.S. Politicsen_US
dc.creatorNankervis, Rose Amberen_US
dc.contributor.authorNankervis, Rose Amberen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe underrepresentation and misrepresentation of women in United States politics are conditions that have existed for centuries. Women have been underrepresented because of the perceptions masculinism and gender hierarchy have created. These ideologies privilege men and masculine qualities, which puts women at a disadvantage. Research has shown that women are just as successful as men when running for office. Women, however, remain underrepresented primarily because they choose not to run. A few reasons why women choose not to run are that their roles as wives and mothers may interfere with their candidacies and they tend to have less money, fewer political contacts, and less appropriate employment histories. Aside from women choosing not to run, there are some other reasons why women are underrepresented in United States politics and these are referred to as barriers that need to be overcome. Some of these barriers are social and gendered stereotypes, incumbency, sex discrimination and the political system itself. These barriers pose a problem because they deter women from running for office and they keep the women who run from succeeding. Women have successfully weakened many of these barriers but there is still progress to be made in order for them to reach parity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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