The Invention and Development of the "Psychofamilial" Theory of Criminology: A Melding of Psychological and Family-Related Explanations for Why Individuals Commit Crimes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271615
Title:
The Invention and Development of the "Psychofamilial" Theory of Criminology: A Melding of Psychological and Family-Related Explanations for Why Individuals Commit Crimes
Author:
Demar, Jessica Leah
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This paper proposes an answer to the hypothesis: What causes individuals to commit crimes? This is a question that criminologists have sought the answer to for generations. I agreed with positivist crime theory that purports crime is not chosen per say but rather it is based on a deterministic model dependent on the cause-and-effect relationship between the individual and external factors in their surrounding world. Yet, I disagreed that certain theories within the positivist frame should be separated sociologically and individually. Inspired by experiences sentencing juvenile delinquents in Pima County, I proposed the unique and comprehensive Psychofamilial Theory that I concluded adequately reconciled the strengths and rectified the weaknesses, and conflicts between the sociological-familial crime theory and the individual-psychological crime theory.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Invention and Development of the "Psychofamilial" Theory of Criminology: A Melding of Psychological and Family-Related Explanations for Why Individuals Commit Crimesen_US
dc.creatorDemar, Jessica Leahen_US
dc.contributor.authorDemar, Jessica Leahen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper proposes an answer to the hypothesis: What causes individuals to commit crimes? This is a question that criminologists have sought the answer to for generations. I agreed with positivist crime theory that purports crime is not chosen per say but rather it is based on a deterministic model dependent on the cause-and-effect relationship between the individual and external factors in their surrounding world. Yet, I disagreed that certain theories within the positivist frame should be separated sociologically and individually. Inspired by experiences sentencing juvenile delinquents in Pima County, I proposed the unique and comprehensive Psychofamilial Theory that I concluded adequately reconciled the strengths and rectified the weaknesses, and conflicts between the sociological-familial crime theory and the individual-psychological crime theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.