Weighing the Importance of Vital Signs in the Evaluation of Alcohol Withdrawal in Multiple Ethnicities When Employing the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271614
Title:
Weighing the Importance of Vital Signs in the Evaluation of Alcohol Withdrawal in Multiple Ethnicities When Employing the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment
Author:
Barnett, Jared Joshua Anucha
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was performed at an acute alcohol and drug rehabilitation center in Southern Arizona mainly serving three ethnicities; Caucasian, Hispanic, and Native-American. The CIWA-Ar assessment is used to evaluate the severity of withdrawal and a score of 10 or higher to the subjective questions results in admission to the in-patient unit. It has been observed that the Native-American patients suffering from withdrawal generally score lower on the CIWA-Ar scale compared to the other ethnicities, thus resulting in a lack of admission or reduced treatment. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether blood pressure and pulse should be used in conjunction with the CIWA-Ar assessment to aid in the evaluation of withdrawal among the ethnicities. The three ethnicities were not equally represented at the clinic. It was found that there is statistical evidence that blood pressure and pulse are significantly increased in withdrawal patients of all ethnicities and that the pulse measurements for Native-American patients do not differ from those observed for admitted Caucasian and Hispanic patients. Native-American patients seem to demonstrate similar vital signs to the withdrawing patients of the other two ethnicities, yet only 3 total patients were admitted.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWeighing the Importance of Vital Signs in the Evaluation of Alcohol Withdrawal in Multiple Ethnicities When Employing the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessmenten_US
dc.creatorBarnett, Jared Joshua Anuchaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Jared Joshua Anuchaen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was performed at an acute alcohol and drug rehabilitation center in Southern Arizona mainly serving three ethnicities; Caucasian, Hispanic, and Native-American. The CIWA-Ar assessment is used to evaluate the severity of withdrawal and a score of 10 or higher to the subjective questions results in admission to the in-patient unit. It has been observed that the Native-American patients suffering from withdrawal generally score lower on the CIWA-Ar scale compared to the other ethnicities, thus resulting in a lack of admission or reduced treatment. The purpose of this study was to analyze whether blood pressure and pulse should be used in conjunction with the CIWA-Ar assessment to aid in the evaluation of withdrawal among the ethnicities. The three ethnicities were not equally represented at the clinic. It was found that there is statistical evidence that blood pressure and pulse are significantly increased in withdrawal patients of all ethnicities and that the pulse measurements for Native-American patients do not differ from those observed for admitted Caucasian and Hispanic patients. Native-American patients seem to demonstrate similar vital signs to the withdrawing patients of the other two ethnicities, yet only 3 total patients were admitted.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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