Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271612
Title:
What's in Self-Referential Imagining?
Author:
Adler, Ira R.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The combination of memory-enhancing processes of imagining and of self-reference has been shown to improve memory function, the Self-Imagining Effect (SIE), in healthy subjects and in Persons with neurological damage resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prior studies Have instructed participants to "imagine yourself' but have not confirmed that self-referential Information is being accessed in self-imagining. The current study investigated the content of Self-referential imagining which may mediate the SIE advantage. Participants, both healthy Persons and persons who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and suffer memory Impairment, were instructed to imagine themselves and an "other-person" interacting with various objects and to simultaneously describe their imaginings. The recorded imaginings were Scored for descriptive (location, agent, event and perception/emotion) and referential (self, other Specific, and general) elements. Findings suggest that self-imagining does access self-referential Information and is more content-rich than other-person imagining. The elements found in self-imagining were representative of episodic-like information. Other-person imagining, while not as content-rich, contained proportionately similar descriptive elements. The study provides a Better understanding of the salient features of self-imagining and may elucidate the role of self-referential Knowledge in mnemonic strategies in persons with neurological damage due to TBI.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWhat's in Self-Referential Imagining?en_US
dc.creatorAdler, Ira R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Ira R.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe combination of memory-enhancing processes of imagining and of self-reference has been shown to improve memory function, the Self-Imagining Effect (SIE), in healthy subjects and in Persons with neurological damage resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prior studies Have instructed participants to "imagine yourself' but have not confirmed that self-referential Information is being accessed in self-imagining. The current study investigated the content of Self-referential imagining which may mediate the SIE advantage. Participants, both healthy Persons and persons who had sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and suffer memory Impairment, were instructed to imagine themselves and an "other-person" interacting with various objects and to simultaneously describe their imaginings. The recorded imaginings were Scored for descriptive (location, agent, event and perception/emotion) and referential (self, other Specific, and general) elements. Findings suggest that self-imagining does access self-referential Information and is more content-rich than other-person imagining. The elements found in self-imagining were representative of episodic-like information. Other-person imagining, while not as content-rich, contained proportionately similar descriptive elements. The study provides a Better understanding of the salient features of self-imagining and may elucidate the role of self-referential Knowledge in mnemonic strategies in persons with neurological damage due to TBI.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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