Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271606
Title:
The Denial of "Democracy": The Russian Dilemma
Author:
Cohen, Eden Gavrielle
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There is a strong sentiment in Western political science literature that Russia as a state is nondemocratic, adhering strongly to autocratic principles. However, the purpose of this study is to present an alternative view of the Russian political system under Putin. This study demonstrates that there is evidence that suggests that Russia does have democratic principles, and is currently transitioning into becoming a democratic state. The democratization that is occurring in Russia is not the Western type of democracy that many in the Western world are familiar with, but it is one that fulfills Russian political needs and expectations of government and leadership. The research gathered for this analysis mainly uses quantitative means in order to support the argument presented. In order to indicate a fair view, the literature used was both Russian and Western, thus presenting alternatives views. Results indicate that Russia does have free, fair, and competitive elections, freedom of speech, and participation by the masses. Yet, impediments to full democratization include the media, a super-presidentialist system, and a concentration of power within certain areas of government. In order for Russia to become more democratic, it must overcome such impediments.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Denial of "Democracy": The Russian Dilemmaen_US
dc.creatorCohen, Eden Gavrielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Eden Gavrielleen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is a strong sentiment in Western political science literature that Russia as a state is nondemocratic, adhering strongly to autocratic principles. However, the purpose of this study is to present an alternative view of the Russian political system under Putin. This study demonstrates that there is evidence that suggests that Russia does have democratic principles, and is currently transitioning into becoming a democratic state. The democratization that is occurring in Russia is not the Western type of democracy that many in the Western world are familiar with, but it is one that fulfills Russian political needs and expectations of government and leadership. The research gathered for this analysis mainly uses quantitative means in order to support the argument presented. In order to indicate a fair view, the literature used was both Russian and Western, thus presenting alternatives views. Results indicate that Russia does have free, fair, and competitive elections, freedom of speech, and participation by the masses. Yet, impediments to full democratization include the media, a super-presidentialist system, and a concentration of power within certain areas of government. In order for Russia to become more democratic, it must overcome such impediments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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