Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271212
Title:
Native American Ethnographic Study of Tonto National Monument
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Toupal, Rebecca; Van Vlack, Kathleen; Diaz de Valdes, Rachel; O'Meara, Sean; Medwied-Savage, Jessica
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2008
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Description:
Tonto National Monument was established by President Theodore Roosevelt on December 19, 1907 in order to protect and preserve the cliff structures and other archeological sites that were deemed places of “great ethnographic, scientific and educational interest” for future generations. The land that encompasses Tonto National Monument has been used by Native American peoples for at least 10,000 years. For the purpose of addressing their consultation responsibilities under the federal law and mandates, the National Park Service contracted with the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA) at the University of Arizona (UofA) to complete a Native American site interpretation study at Tonto National Monument. The purpose of this study is to bring forth Native American perspectives and understandings of the land and the resources. This study has helped to foster relationships between the Monument and the tribes. Close relationships with contemporary tribes hold the potential of learning more about the Monument’s cultural history and its continuing significance to Indian peoples. This increased awareness of contemporary Indian ties to the Monument, and to the surrounding region, will help the NPS design interpretative programs and manage resources in a culturally sensitive manner.
Keywords:
Arizona; Tonto National Monument; Hopi; Zuni; Apache; Native American Cultural Resources

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNative American Ethnographic Study of Tonto National Monumenten_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorToupal, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Vlack, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDiaz de Valdes, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Meara, Seanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMedwied-Savage, Jessicaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.descriptionTonto National Monument was established by President Theodore Roosevelt on December 19, 1907 in order to protect and preserve the cliff structures and other archeological sites that were deemed places of “great ethnographic, scientific and educational interest” for future generations. The land that encompasses Tonto National Monument has been used by Native American peoples for at least 10,000 years. For the purpose of addressing their consultation responsibilities under the federal law and mandates, the National Park Service contracted with the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA) at the University of Arizona (UofA) to complete a Native American site interpretation study at Tonto National Monument. The purpose of this study is to bring forth Native American perspectives and understandings of the land and the resources. This study has helped to foster relationships between the Monument and the tribes. Close relationships with contemporary tribes hold the potential of learning more about the Monument’s cultural history and its continuing significance to Indian peoples. This increased awareness of contemporary Indian ties to the Monument, and to the surrounding region, will help the NPS design interpretative programs and manage resources in a culturally sensitive manner.en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectTonto National Monumenten_US
dc.subjectHopien_US
dc.subjectZunien_US
dc.subjectApacheen_US
dc.subjectNative American Cultural Resourcesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/271212-
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