Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271052
Title:
Ethnographic Overview and Assessment: Zion National Park Utah, and Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Austin, Diane; Halmo, David; Phillips, Arthur
Issue Date:
Jul-1999
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology
Description:
This is an applied ethnographic study of Southern Paiute cultural resources and how these are related to the natural ecosystems that surround and incorporate Zion National Park in southern Utah and Pipe Spring National Monument in northern Arizona. Southern Paiute people perceive Zion National Park and Pipe Spring National Monument as places whose significance derives from larger cultural and ecological landscapes. Southern Paiute people view both parks as being parts of riverine ecosystems. Zion National Park is a place along the Virgin River, and Pipe Spring National Monument part of the greater Kanab Creek Hydrological System. The current boundaries of both parks are largely irrelevant for understanding the lives of birds that fly along the river, of deer who seasonally migrate up and down the river, and of fish who swim in the river. Paiute people, whose ancestors lived along these riverine ecosystems for a thousand years or more, recognize that the plants they gathered, the animals they hunted, and the lives they lived are unrelated to the current boundaries of these two parks. As a result, the National Park Service and the Southern Paiutes arrived at the same conclusion: that is, to understand the cultural and natural significance of these parks requires knowledge of their relationships with other places. Thus it is both administratively and culturally appropriate for this applied ethnographic study to follow an ecosystem approach. This study was unique in two major ways. Unlike many other American Indian cultural resources studies conducted within National Parks at this period of time, this study moved beyond the formal boundaries of these NPS units in an effort to understand them as components of a broader natural ecosystem. As such, this study built upon the scientific and social framework for ecologically based stewardship of Federal lands and waters. This report provides both the ethnographic information relating to Pipe Spring National Monument and Zion National Park. This information was then incorporated in the parks’ resource management plans
Keywords:
Zion National Park; Pipe Spring National Monument; Southern Paiute; Ecosystem Management; Cultural Resources

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEthnographic Overview and Assessment: Zion National Park Utah, and Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAustin, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalmo, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Arthuren_US
dc.date.issued1999-07-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Applied Research in Anthropologyen_US
dc.descriptionThis is an applied ethnographic study of Southern Paiute cultural resources and how these are related to the natural ecosystems that surround and incorporate Zion National Park in southern Utah and Pipe Spring National Monument in northern Arizona. Southern Paiute people perceive Zion National Park and Pipe Spring National Monument as places whose significance derives from larger cultural and ecological landscapes. Southern Paiute people view both parks as being parts of riverine ecosystems. Zion National Park is a place along the Virgin River, and Pipe Spring National Monument part of the greater Kanab Creek Hydrological System. The current boundaries of both parks are largely irrelevant for understanding the lives of birds that fly along the river, of deer who seasonally migrate up and down the river, and of fish who swim in the river. Paiute people, whose ancestors lived along these riverine ecosystems for a thousand years or more, recognize that the plants they gathered, the animals they hunted, and the lives they lived are unrelated to the current boundaries of these two parks. As a result, the National Park Service and the Southern Paiutes arrived at the same conclusion: that is, to understand the cultural and natural significance of these parks requires knowledge of their relationships with other places. Thus it is both administratively and culturally appropriate for this applied ethnographic study to follow an ecosystem approach. This study was unique in two major ways. Unlike many other American Indian cultural resources studies conducted within National Parks at this period of time, this study moved beyond the formal boundaries of these NPS units in an effort to understand them as components of a broader natural ecosystem. As such, this study built upon the scientific and social framework for ecologically based stewardship of Federal lands and waters. This report provides both the ethnographic information relating to Pipe Spring National Monument and Zion National Park. This information was then incorporated in the parks’ resource management plansen_US
dc.subjectZion National Parken_US
dc.subjectPipe Spring National Monumenten_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectEcosystem Managementen_US
dc.subjectCultural Resourcesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/271052-
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