Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271015
Title:
Gender variation in writing: Analyzing online dating ads
Author:
Schultz, Patrick
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin
Publisher:
University of Arizona Linguistics Circle
Journal:
Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/271015
Abstract:
In the present study, a corpus of more than 18,000 online dating ads (downloaded from Craigslist.com, ~ 1.4 million words) is used to investigate differences in language use between men and women in the online dating context. Few studies have investigated gender differences in written texts, Newman, Groom et al. (2008), Mulac and Lundell (1994) and Koppel, Argamon et al. (2002) being the notable exceptions. These papers, however, differ remarkably in methodology and results. In the dataset studied here, regression analysis reveals marked differences the use of linguistic features such as emoticons or abbreviations. Writer gender and addressee gender emerge as predictors of variation.
Type:
text; Article
Language:
en_US
ISSN:
0894-4539

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Patricken_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-04T19:32:44Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-04T19:32:44Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.issn0894-4539-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/271015-
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, a corpus of more than 18,000 online dating ads (downloaded from Craigslist.com, ~ 1.4 million words) is used to investigate differences in language use between men and women in the online dating context. Few studies have investigated gender differences in written texts, Newman, Groom et al. (2008), Mulac and Lundell (1994) and Koppel, Argamon et al. (2002) being the notable exceptions. These papers, however, differ remarkably in methodology and results. In the dataset studied here, regression analysis reveals marked differences the use of linguistic features such as emoticons or abbreviations. Writer gender and addressee gender emerge as predictors of variation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona Linguistics Circleen_US
dc.titleGender variation in writing: Analyzing online dating adsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Texas at Austinen_US
dc.identifier.journalCoyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizonaen_US
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