Ha`tata (The Backbone of the River): American Indian Ethnographic Studies Regarding the Hoover Dam Bypass Project

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/270990
Title:
Ha`tata (The Backbone of the River): American Indian Ethnographic Studies Regarding the Hoover Dam Bypass Project
Author:
Stoffle, Richard W.; Zedeno, Maria Nieves,; Eisenberg, Amy; Toupal, Rebecca; Carroll, Alex; Pittaluga, Fabio; Amato, John; Earnest, Trey
Affiliation:
Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
4-Mar-2013
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.
Description:
This is an American Indian ethnographic study for the Hoover Dam Bypass Project. The study sites included three bypass bridge alternatives, each located within one mile from where United States Highway 93 (U.S. 93), at the time of the study, crossed over the top of Hoover Dam at the Arizona-Nevada state line. Due to growth in population and commerce in the Southwest, the roadway at Hoover Dam has experienced a tremendous increase in traffic over the past 30 years, resulting in increased safety hazards to motorists, pedestrians, and the dam itself. Federal, state, and local governments have worked to find a solution to the impacts of increased traffic across Hoover Dam. This project was a continuation of EIS efforts that began in 1989. The goal of this project was to evaluate alternative crossings of the Colorado River near Hoover Dam. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential impacts to American Indian cultural resources related to the three proposed crossing alternatives. This report is an expanded version of the draft produced in 1998. In 2000, funding became available to carry out further ethnographic research and involve Mohave, Hualapai, and Southern Paiute people.
Keywords:
Southern Paiute; Hualapai; Mohave; Cultural Landscapes; Hoover Dam; Arizona; Nevada; Colorado River

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHa`tata (The Backbone of the River): American Indian Ethnographic Studies Regarding the Hoover Dam Bypass Projecten_US
dc.contributor.authorStoffle, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZedeno, Maria Nieves,en_US
dc.contributor.authorEisenberg, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.authorToupal, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Alexen_US
dc.contributor.authorPittaluga, Fabioen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmato, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorEarnest, Treyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued2013-03-04-
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Richard Stoffle Collection. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by Richard Stoffle, Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For more information about items in this collection, please email Special Collections, askspecialcollections@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.sourceUniversity of Arizona Libraries, Special Collectionsen_US
dc.descriptionThis is an American Indian ethnographic study for the Hoover Dam Bypass Project. The study sites included three bypass bridge alternatives, each located within one mile from where United States Highway 93 (U.S. 93), at the time of the study, crossed over the top of Hoover Dam at the Arizona-Nevada state line. Due to growth in population and commerce in the Southwest, the roadway at Hoover Dam has experienced a tremendous increase in traffic over the past 30 years, resulting in increased safety hazards to motorists, pedestrians, and the dam itself. Federal, state, and local governments have worked to find a solution to the impacts of increased traffic across Hoover Dam. This project was a continuation of EIS efforts that began in 1989. The goal of this project was to evaluate alternative crossings of the Colorado River near Hoover Dam. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential impacts to American Indian cultural resources related to the three proposed crossing alternatives. This report is an expanded version of the draft produced in 1998. In 2000, funding became available to carry out further ethnographic research and involve Mohave, Hualapai, and Southern Paiute people.en_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectHualapaien_US
dc.subjectMohaveen_US
dc.subjectCultural Landscapesen_US
dc.subjectHoover Damen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectNevadaen_US
dc.subjectColorado Riveren_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/270990-
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