Crafting and Consuming an American Sonoran Desert: Global Visions, Regional Nature and National Meaning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/268613
Title:
Crafting and Consuming an American Sonoran Desert: Global Visions, Regional Nature and National Meaning
Author:
Burtner, Marcus
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 07-Jan-2015
Abstract:
From the 1840s to 1950s, interpretations of nature played a central role in the defining and enculturating the Sonoran Desert into the American nation. Written works and physical nature like plants became an archive for cultural interpretations of the region. Scientific descriptions of nature became stories of place as they were consumed. Proxy landscapes like national monuments became the spaces for demonstrating these stories. Throughout the period of this study, a constant give and take between regional nature and global arid lands shaped the national interpretations used to describe regional nature within the American nation-state. This work follows the production and consumption of meaning and the definition of a desert region.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Environmental History; History; Sonoran Desert; Arizona; Cacti
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morrissey, Katherine

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCrafting and Consuming an American Sonoran Desert: Global Visions, Regional Nature and National Meaningen_US
dc.creatorBurtner, Marcusen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurtner, Marcusen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 07-Jan-2015en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom the 1840s to 1950s, interpretations of nature played a central role in the defining and enculturating the Sonoran Desert into the American nation. Written works and physical nature like plants became an archive for cultural interpretations of the region. Scientific descriptions of nature became stories of place as they were consumed. Proxy landscapes like national monuments became the spaces for demonstrating these stories. Throughout the period of this study, a constant give and take between regional nature and global arid lands shaped the national interpretations used to describe regional nature within the American nation-state. This work follows the production and consumption of meaning and the definition of a desert region.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Historyen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectCactien_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMorrissey, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeiner, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVetter, Jeremyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMutchler, Jack C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrissey, Katherineen_US
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