Expanding Archaeological Approaches to Ground Stone: Modeling Manufacturing Costs, Analyzing Absorbed Organic Residues, and Exploring Social Dimensions of Milling Tools

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/268534
Title:
Expanding Archaeological Approaches to Ground Stone: Modeling Manufacturing Costs, Analyzing Absorbed Organic Residues, and Exploring Social Dimensions of Milling Tools
Author:
Buonasera, Tammy Yvonne
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although ground stone artifacts comprise a substantial portion of the archaeological record, their use as an important source of information about the past has remained underdeveloped. This is especially true for milling tools (mortars, pestles, grinding slabs and handstones) used by hunter-gatherers. Three studies that apply novel techniques and approaches to prehistoric milling technology are presented here. Together they demonstrate that substantial opportunities exist for new avenues of inquiry in the study of these artifacts. The first combines a simple optimization model from behavioral ecology with experimental data to weigh manufacturing costs against gains in grinding efficiency for mobile hunter-gatherers. Results run counter to widespread assumptions that mobile hunter-gatherers should not spend time shaping grinding surfaces on milling tools. Next, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used to analyze lipid preservation in modified rock features in dry caves at Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, New Mexico. A high concentration of lipids, derived from processing a seed resource, was recovered from a grinding surface in these caves. The lipid content in this surface is comparable to amounts recovered from select pottery sherds that have been used for radiocarbon dating. The third study uses synchronic and diachronic variability in morphology, use-wear, and symbolic content to analyze ground stone milling tools from mortuary contexts in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. Archaeological and ethnographic evidence supports the inferred association of certain mortars with feasting and ritual activities. Differences in the representation of some of these forms in male and female graves may reflect changes in the roles of women and men in community ritual and politics.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Gender; Ground Stone; Mortuary Analysis; Optimality Models; Anthropology; Absorbed Organic Residues; Food Processing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stiner, Mary C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleExpanding Archaeological Approaches to Ground Stone: Modeling Manufacturing Costs, Analyzing Absorbed Organic Residues, and Exploring Social Dimensions of Milling Toolsen_US
dc.creatorBuonasera, Tammy Yvonneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuonasera, Tammy Yvonneen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough ground stone artifacts comprise a substantial portion of the archaeological record, their use as an important source of information about the past has remained underdeveloped. This is especially true for milling tools (mortars, pestles, grinding slabs and handstones) used by hunter-gatherers. Three studies that apply novel techniques and approaches to prehistoric milling technology are presented here. Together they demonstrate that substantial opportunities exist for new avenues of inquiry in the study of these artifacts. The first combines a simple optimization model from behavioral ecology with experimental data to weigh manufacturing costs against gains in grinding efficiency for mobile hunter-gatherers. Results run counter to widespread assumptions that mobile hunter-gatherers should not spend time shaping grinding surfaces on milling tools. Next, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used to analyze lipid preservation in modified rock features in dry caves at Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, New Mexico. A high concentration of lipids, derived from processing a seed resource, was recovered from a grinding surface in these caves. The lipid content in this surface is comparable to amounts recovered from select pottery sherds that have been used for radiocarbon dating. The third study uses synchronic and diachronic variability in morphology, use-wear, and symbolic content to analyze ground stone milling tools from mortuary contexts in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. Archaeological and ethnographic evidence supports the inferred association of certain mortars with feasting and ritual activities. Differences in the representation of some of these forms in male and female graves may reflect changes in the roles of women and men in community ritual and politics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectGround Stoneen_US
dc.subjectMortuary Analysisen_US
dc.subjectOptimality Modelsen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectAbsorbed Organic Residuesen_US
dc.subjectFood Processingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStiner, Mary C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKuhn, Steven L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFish, Suzanne K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEerkens, Jelmer W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStiner, Mary C.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.