Factors Influencing Gifted Students' Transition, Adaptation, and Persistence in College

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/268375
Title:
Factors Influencing Gifted Students' Transition, Adaptation, and Persistence in College
Author:
Gomez, Maria Paz
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The popular belief that has been held for many years has been that students who have been identified as gifted would succeed academically in college because of their previous success in high school. However, in countries with a disadvantaged and unequal school system, one that is stratified according to groups' socioeconomic status, such as Chile, this statement could be questioned. Using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, the three studies presented in this dissertation have provided evidence confirming that gifted students had difficulties related to the transition to and persistence in college. Some of these difficulties were related to gifted students' initial academic performance in college and could be explained by their high school academic preparedness. Students who attended public schools had lower scores on the college entrance test (PSU) and had a lower academic performance in college than their gifted counterparts from voucher (charter) schools, as found in studies I and II. However, despite several academic difficulties, such as failing courses and falling behind their classmates, all students showed high levels of commitment, motivation, and a strong overall desire for continuing their higher education studies, as shown in studies II and III. Other difficulties were related to initial problems regarding social adaptation to college, as shown in study II. Implications for research and practice were discussed in all three studies, and include suggestions such as the creation of pre-college and within-college support programs for college gifted students who have not been provided with challenging and/or high-level opportunities to meet college academic expectations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
readiness; transition; Special Education; gifted college students; persistence
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maker, Carol June

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors Influencing Gifted Students' Transition, Adaptation, and Persistence in Collegeen_US
dc.creatorGomez, Maria Pazen_US
dc.contributor.authorGomez, Maria Pazen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe popular belief that has been held for many years has been that students who have been identified as gifted would succeed academically in college because of their previous success in high school. However, in countries with a disadvantaged and unequal school system, one that is stratified according to groups' socioeconomic status, such as Chile, this statement could be questioned. Using quantitative and qualitative methodologies, the three studies presented in this dissertation have provided evidence confirming that gifted students had difficulties related to the transition to and persistence in college. Some of these difficulties were related to gifted students' initial academic performance in college and could be explained by their high school academic preparedness. Students who attended public schools had lower scores on the college entrance test (PSU) and had a lower academic performance in college than their gifted counterparts from voucher (charter) schools, as found in studies I and II. However, despite several academic difficulties, such as failing courses and falling behind their classmates, all students showed high levels of commitment, motivation, and a strong overall desire for continuing their higher education studies, as shown in studies II and III. Other difficulties were related to initial problems regarding social adaptation to college, as shown in study II. Implications for research and practice were discussed in all three studies, and include suggestions such as the creation of pre-college and within-college support programs for college gifted students who have not been provided with challenging and/or high-level opportunities to meet college academic expectations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectreadinessen_US
dc.subjecttransitionen_US
dc.subjectSpecial Educationen_US
dc.subjectgifted college studentsen_US
dc.subjectpersistenceen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaker, Carol Juneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLiaupsin, Carlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaker, Carol Juneen_US
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