Identity Perceptions of Music Performance/Music Education Double Majors: A Qualitative Study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/268353
Title:
Identity Perceptions of Music Performance/Music Education Double Majors: A Qualitative Study
Author:
Sieger, Crystal Anne
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Undergraduate students who double major in music performance and music education often face issues with identity perception unlike those of their single-major counterparts. As they simultaneously develop both identities, double majors cope with additional challenges as they determine who they are and who they hope to become. Some easily adapt to both identities--incorporating values of both majors to create a well-rounded persona--while others struggle to find balance between the two identities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early stages of performer-teacher identity by examining double majors in various stages of their programs of study who aspire to become a performer and music educator. Using individual and focus-group interviews and e-mail prompts, I investigated the experiences of five undergraduate students majoring in music education and music performance. Participants were asked to describe influences that led them to the double major. They were also asked to consider which of their majors they felt to be more prominent, and how they intended to utilize each major in their future. Participants also described qualities of ideal performers and teachers. They responded to questions regarding training received and perceptions of superiority and inferiority within the school of music. Six themes emerged from the analysis. I found that participants were enveloped in varying degrees of blended musician identity depending on the length of their experience. Participants had been socialized primarily by family and teachers, and secondarily by applied professors and practical experiences. They felt most like performers or teachers when involved in hands-on experiences, and those experiences that were considered in real-life situations were the most helpful in identity development. Participants expressed concerns regarding heavy workloads and their ability to develop adequate skills for success. I also discovered a tendency of participants to cater to the perceptions of those within their environment. Concern for the opinions of others often led to a superiority/inferiority conflict between performance majors and music education majors both within and across applied studios. Implications for music school faculty and music students are included.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Music Education; Music Performance; Performer-Teachers; Teacher Identity; Music; Double Major Identity; Identity
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Draves, Tami J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIdentity Perceptions of Music Performance/Music Education Double Majors: A Qualitative Studyen_US
dc.creatorSieger, Crystal Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorSieger, Crystal Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUndergraduate students who double major in music performance and music education often face issues with identity perception unlike those of their single-major counterparts. As they simultaneously develop both identities, double majors cope with additional challenges as they determine who they are and who they hope to become. Some easily adapt to both identities--incorporating values of both majors to create a well-rounded persona--while others struggle to find balance between the two identities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early stages of performer-teacher identity by examining double majors in various stages of their programs of study who aspire to become a performer and music educator. Using individual and focus-group interviews and e-mail prompts, I investigated the experiences of five undergraduate students majoring in music education and music performance. Participants were asked to describe influences that led them to the double major. They were also asked to consider which of their majors they felt to be more prominent, and how they intended to utilize each major in their future. Participants also described qualities of ideal performers and teachers. They responded to questions regarding training received and perceptions of superiority and inferiority within the school of music. Six themes emerged from the analysis. I found that participants were enveloped in varying degrees of blended musician identity depending on the length of their experience. Participants had been socialized primarily by family and teachers, and secondarily by applied professors and practical experiences. They felt most like performers or teachers when involved in hands-on experiences, and those experiences that were considered in real-life situations were the most helpful in identity development. Participants expressed concerns regarding heavy workloads and their ability to develop adequate skills for success. I also discovered a tendency of participants to cater to the perceptions of those within their environment. Concern for the opinions of others often led to a superiority/inferiority conflict between performance majors and music education majors both within and across applied studios. Implications for music school faculty and music students are included.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectMusic Educationen_US
dc.subjectMusic Performanceen_US
dc.subjectPerformer-Teachersen_US
dc.subjectTeacher Identityen_US
dc.subjectMusicen_US
dc.subjectDouble Major Identityen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDraves, Tami J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Shellyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson Manternach, Jeremy N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDraves, Tami J.en_US
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