Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/267573
Title:
Implementing Regional Responsiveness: Architectural Inspiration from the American Southwest
Author:
Maxwell, D. C.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Embargo:
Thesis Not Available (per Author's Request)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This work advocates the implementation of the theory of Regionally Responsive architecture into the curriculum of architectural education; combining: (1) Increased awareness of historic architecture and regional treasures. (2) Understanding and applying the theory of Critical Regionalism in a regional context (3) Understanding and applying the basics of passive design strategies in response to climate (4) Understanding and applying the use of the most contemporary quantitative analytical tools (including various measuring apparatuses, computer simulations, wind tunnels, and daylight simulators) The goal is to integrate these four concepts into all sectors of architectural instruction to provide a lens of Regional Responsiveness to inform the student’s design work and professional paradigms. The laboratory for this work is the American Southwest and the prehistoric ruins. The concepts, however, are broad enough for incorporation into any region for any time period.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Architecture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalfoun, Nader

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImplementing Regional Responsiveness: Architectural Inspiration from the American Southwesten_US
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, D. C.en_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.releaseThesis Not Available (per Author's Request)en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis work advocates the implementation of the theory of Regionally Responsive architecture into the curriculum of architectural education; combining: (1) Increased awareness of historic architecture and regional treasures. (2) Understanding and applying the theory of Critical Regionalism in a regional context (3) Understanding and applying the basics of passive design strategies in response to climate (4) Understanding and applying the use of the most contemporary quantitative analytical tools (including various measuring apparatuses, computer simulations, wind tunnels, and daylight simulators) The goal is to integrate these four concepts into all sectors of architectural instruction to provide a lens of Regional Responsiveness to inform the student’s design work and professional paradigms. The laboratory for this work is the American Southwest and the prehistoric ruins. The concepts, however, are broad enough for incorporation into any region for any time period.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChalfoun, Naderen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoeller, Colbyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolmlund, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfoun, Naderen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/267573-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.