Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/267092
Title:
Low Energy Strategies for Thermal Stress Reduction Through the Collection and Reuse of Water in an Arid Urban Environment
Author:
Gervais, Marie
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The Painted Desert Community is located within the boundaries of the Petrified Forest National Park in North-Eastern Arizona. Situated on a windswept plain with an elevation of approximately 5,000 feet and an annual rainfall of 9.58 inches, the community serves as a research, conference and visitor center for the Petrified Forest National Park. The community was built as part of the Mission 66 program that aimed to promote the National Park system and was designed by the renowned architect Richard Neutra and his partner in 1956. Among the elements incorporated into the master plan were long and short-term residences, a schoolroom and an administrative building housing the Visitor Center for the park. Envisioned as a "microcosm of a city zoned into residential, commercial, recreation and industrial areas", Richard Neutra and his partner Robert Alexander's design focused on wind-breaking strategies and incorporated a number of outdoor areas intended to provide various levels of privacy. These included compact private courtyard spaces attached to each housing unit and a series of larger "oasis" spaces between buildings. The design was originally intended to merge the aesthetics of International Modernist style with the climate-responsive strategies of traditional Native American structures, namely a compact human settlement surrounding a large central courtyard. It is the author's opinion that the interpretation of the traditional city-style pueblo was of a morphological rather than a functional nature. The goal of this thesis is to synthesize the ideals of the International Modernist style displayed in the Painted Desert Community with current principles of water harvesting and management strategies to improve both the interior and exterior spaces in portions of the complex. It would seem that water and energy conservation were not a priority at the time of the design which, combined with budget cuts resulting in poor maintenance, has contributed to the deterioration of both interior and exterior spaces. The goal of this study is to investigate and propose alterations to the existing buildings and their immediate surroundings that will maximize water usage efficiency and collection within buildings, with the ultimate goal of reducing thermal stress within the buildings through the introduction of both passive and active strategies to manipulate the building envelope and the strategic use of landscape elements, and increasing the opportunities to enjoy the outdoor spaces that the architects had originally envisioned. Using advanced architectural modeling and a methodology responsive to climactic, geological, environmental and social factors, the proposed modifications to the original design strategy will aim to implement advanced responses to the specific microcosm of this dense built environment in an effort to preserve the most delicate natural resource of this arid region. Final documentation will include both quantitative and qualitative data. Furthermore, the author hopes to create an adaptable prototypical approach that can be used to develop strategies on a larger scale in arid and semi-arid climates.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalfoun, Nader

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLow Energy Strategies for Thermal Stress Reduction Through the Collection and Reuse of Water in an Arid Urban Environmenten_US
dc.contributor.authorGervais, Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Painted Desert Community is located within the boundaries of the Petrified Forest National Park in North-Eastern Arizona. Situated on a windswept plain with an elevation of approximately 5,000 feet and an annual rainfall of 9.58 inches, the community serves as a research, conference and visitor center for the Petrified Forest National Park. The community was built as part of the Mission 66 program that aimed to promote the National Park system and was designed by the renowned architect Richard Neutra and his partner in 1956. Among the elements incorporated into the master plan were long and short-term residences, a schoolroom and an administrative building housing the Visitor Center for the park. Envisioned as a "microcosm of a city zoned into residential, commercial, recreation and industrial areas", Richard Neutra and his partner Robert Alexander's design focused on wind-breaking strategies and incorporated a number of outdoor areas intended to provide various levels of privacy. These included compact private courtyard spaces attached to each housing unit and a series of larger "oasis" spaces between buildings. The design was originally intended to merge the aesthetics of International Modernist style with the climate-responsive strategies of traditional Native American structures, namely a compact human settlement surrounding a large central courtyard. It is the author's opinion that the interpretation of the traditional city-style pueblo was of a morphological rather than a functional nature. The goal of this thesis is to synthesize the ideals of the International Modernist style displayed in the Painted Desert Community with current principles of water harvesting and management strategies to improve both the interior and exterior spaces in portions of the complex. It would seem that water and energy conservation were not a priority at the time of the design which, combined with budget cuts resulting in poor maintenance, has contributed to the deterioration of both interior and exterior spaces. The goal of this study is to investigate and propose alterations to the existing buildings and their immediate surroundings that will maximize water usage efficiency and collection within buildings, with the ultimate goal of reducing thermal stress within the buildings through the introduction of both passive and active strategies to manipulate the building envelope and the strategic use of landscape elements, and increasing the opportunities to enjoy the outdoor spaces that the architects had originally envisioned. Using advanced architectural modeling and a methodology responsive to climactic, geological, environmental and social factors, the proposed modifications to the original design strategy will aim to implement advanced responses to the specific microcosm of this dense built environment in an effort to preserve the most delicate natural resource of this arid region. Final documentation will include both quantitative and qualitative data. Furthermore, the author hopes to create an adaptable prototypical approach that can be used to develop strategies on a larger scale in arid and semi-arid climates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChalfoun, Naderen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarnes, Rayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStoltz, Ronen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/267092-
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