Crafting Community, Reconstructing Identities, and Performing Traditions: Ethnoarchaeology of Burnay Pottery Tradition and Community Integration in Vigan Ilocos, Sur, Philippines

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/265816
Title:
Crafting Community, Reconstructing Identities, and Performing Traditions: Ethnoarchaeology of Burnay Pottery Tradition and Community Integration in Vigan Ilocos, Sur, Philippines
Author:
Cano, Jenny Ruth Moral
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 04-Dec-2014
Abstract:
This ethnoarchaoeological research project examines how pottery is used in the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the contemporary Vigan community in the province of Ilocos Sur, northern Philippines. During the past decade, the city of Vigan has been reconstructing its community identity as part of its transformation as one of UNESCO's World Heritage Site. Within this context, Vigan has been packaging a set of key symbols that help construct and convey a distinct sense of community identity. Significantly, local craft objects and crafting practices have been used to convey images and meanings of what it considers to be a part of community heritage. This study specifically investigates how the framing of burnay pottery production as a local craft tradition led to the privileging of burnay jars in representing the Vigan community. However, because the technology of burnay pottery production was introduced by Chinese immigrants in the late nineteenth century, its framing as a local tradition seems contradictory. By analyzing the technological attributes and production practices of the burnay pottery tradition, this study examines the contradictions and coherence in claims of heritage in crafting practices. Furthermore, in examining the transformation of an adopted technological practice into a local tradition, this study explores the construction of value surrounding the burnay pottery tradition and burnay jars within the Vigan community. It highlights the practice and performance of the burnay pottery tradition in attributing value to burnay jars as an important symbol for contemporary Vigan community identity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
performance; pottery; practice; production; Anthropology; community; heritage
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mills, Barbara J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCrafting Community, Reconstructing Identities, and Performing Traditions: Ethnoarchaeology of Burnay Pottery Tradition and Community Integration in Vigan Ilocos, Sur, Philippinesen_US
dc.creatorCano, Jenny Ruth Moralen_US
dc.contributor.authorCano, Jenny Ruth Moralen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 04-Dec-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThis ethnoarchaoeological research project examines how pottery is used in the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the contemporary Vigan community in the province of Ilocos Sur, northern Philippines. During the past decade, the city of Vigan has been reconstructing its community identity as part of its transformation as one of UNESCO's World Heritage Site. Within this context, Vigan has been packaging a set of key symbols that help construct and convey a distinct sense of community identity. Significantly, local craft objects and crafting practices have been used to convey images and meanings of what it considers to be a part of community heritage. This study specifically investigates how the framing of burnay pottery production as a local craft tradition led to the privileging of burnay jars in representing the Vigan community. However, because the technology of burnay pottery production was introduced by Chinese immigrants in the late nineteenth century, its framing as a local tradition seems contradictory. By analyzing the technological attributes and production practices of the burnay pottery tradition, this study examines the contradictions and coherence in claims of heritage in crafting practices. Furthermore, in examining the transformation of an adopted technological practice into a local tradition, this study explores the construction of value surrounding the burnay pottery tradition and burnay jars within the Vigan community. It highlights the practice and performance of the burnay pottery tradition in attributing value to burnay jars as an important symbol for contemporary Vigan community identity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectperformanceen_US
dc.subjectpotteryen_US
dc.subjectpracticeen_US
dc.subjectproductionen_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectcommunityen_US
dc.subjectheritageen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlonso, Ana M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKillick, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLongacre, William A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMills, Barbara J.en_US
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