Pixelated Mask Polarization Based Spatial Carrier Interference Microscopy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/265560
Title:
Pixelated Mask Polarization Based Spatial Carrier Interference Microscopy
Author:
Wiersma, Joshua Thomas
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 15-Nov-2014
Abstract:
The following dissertation demonstrates the advantages of using a camera with a pixelated polarization mask allowing spatial carrier phase shifting in interference microscopy. An interference microscope in the Michelson and Linnik configurations integrates a camera equipped with a pixelated polarization mask. The camera utilizes polarization to simultaneously capture four phase shifted interferograms. Each set of four phase shifted fringe patterns permits the calculation of fringe contrast and phase at a point in the vertical scan of a test surface. The use of a short coherence source enables construction of a coarse surface profile by estimating the localization of the peak fringe contrast over the vertical scan. The coarse profile allows unwrapping of the less noisy, though circumstantially ambiguous, phase data. Established phase shifting interference microscopy methods utilize temporal phase shifting techniques. Temporal methods contrast spatial methods by acquiring each set of interferograms necessary for calculating fringe contrast and phase by scanning the test object. The scanning changes the optical path difference between the interferometer arms thus inducing the phase shifts. While both methods scan the test surface, spatial methods acquire all of the information needed to calculate fringe contrast and phase simultaneously while the temporal methods require data from multiple points in the scan. Furthermore, the focus and fringe contrast also change between phase shifts and introduce a small error in temporal methods. However, the largest source of error results from the time taken between capturing the phase shifted frames comprising each set where environmental disturbances such as vibration can change the fringe pattern. The subsequent work shows the practicality of performing interference microscopy with a pixelated polarization mask as well as the technique's relative vibration insensitivity.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Optical Sciences
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wyant, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePixelated Mask Polarization Based Spatial Carrier Interference Microscopyen_US
dc.creatorWiersma, Joshua Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiersma, Joshua Thomasen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.releaseRelease after 15-Nov-2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe following dissertation demonstrates the advantages of using a camera with a pixelated polarization mask allowing spatial carrier phase shifting in interference microscopy. An interference microscope in the Michelson and Linnik configurations integrates a camera equipped with a pixelated polarization mask. The camera utilizes polarization to simultaneously capture four phase shifted interferograms. Each set of four phase shifted fringe patterns permits the calculation of fringe contrast and phase at a point in the vertical scan of a test surface. The use of a short coherence source enables construction of a coarse surface profile by estimating the localization of the peak fringe contrast over the vertical scan. The coarse profile allows unwrapping of the less noisy, though circumstantially ambiguous, phase data. Established phase shifting interference microscopy methods utilize temporal phase shifting techniques. Temporal methods contrast spatial methods by acquiring each set of interferograms necessary for calculating fringe contrast and phase by scanning the test object. The scanning changes the optical path difference between the interferometer arms thus inducing the phase shifts. While both methods scan the test surface, spatial methods acquire all of the information needed to calculate fringe contrast and phase simultaneously while the temporal methods require data from multiple points in the scan. Furthermore, the focus and fringe contrast also change between phase shifts and introduce a small error in temporal methods. However, the largest source of error results from the time taken between capturing the phase shifted frames comprising each set where environmental disturbances such as vibration can change the fringe pattern. The subsequent work shows the practicality of performing interference microscopy with a pixelated polarization mask as well as the technique's relative vibration insensitivity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWyant, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorth-Morris, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwiegerling, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWyant, Jamesen_US
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