Lenses of Indigenous Feminism: Digging Up the Roots of Western Patriarchy in Perma Red and Monkey Beach

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/265552
Title:
Lenses of Indigenous Feminism: Digging Up the Roots of Western Patriarchy in Perma Red and Monkey Beach
Author:
CampBell, Pamela K.
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Western patriarchy has become deeply ingrained in Indigenous Nations. Patriarchal ideology takes many harmful forms in Indigenous communities, most notably sexism, misogyny, family violence, and violence against women. Indigenous feminists are identifying and resisting patriarchy in Indigenous communities. However, Western patriarchy is so deeply rooted that many people believe it has always been there. Additionally, several Indigenous people resist all forms of feminism, believing the word "feminist" is synonymous with "white," and therefore suspicious. In order to increase trust in Indigenous feminisms, it must be proved that Indigenous feminist theories stand up to scrutiny. The characters in Debra Earling's Perma Red and Eden Robinson's Monkey Beach, particularly the protagonists Louise White Elk and Lisa Hill, are negatively affected by Western patriarchal ideology in their communities. By examining these texts through Indigenous feminist lenses, my thesis seeks to prove that Indigenous feminisms are viable additions to Indigenous Studies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Native; Patriarchy; Violence; American Indian Studies; Feminism; Indigenous
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Washburn, Frances

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLenses of Indigenous Feminism: Digging Up the Roots of Western Patriarchy in Perma Red and Monkey Beachen_US
dc.creatorCampBell, Pamela K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCampBell, Pamela K.en_US
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWestern patriarchy has become deeply ingrained in Indigenous Nations. Patriarchal ideology takes many harmful forms in Indigenous communities, most notably sexism, misogyny, family violence, and violence against women. Indigenous feminists are identifying and resisting patriarchy in Indigenous communities. However, Western patriarchy is so deeply rooted that many people believe it has always been there. Additionally, several Indigenous people resist all forms of feminism, believing the word "feminist" is synonymous with "white," and therefore suspicious. In order to increase trust in Indigenous feminisms, it must be proved that Indigenous feminist theories stand up to scrutiny. The characters in Debra Earling's Perma Red and Eden Robinson's Monkey Beach, particularly the protagonists Louise White Elk and Lisa Hill, are negatively affected by Western patriarchal ideology in their communities. By examining these texts through Indigenous feminist lenses, my thesis seeks to prove that Indigenous feminisms are viable additions to Indigenous Studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectNativeen_US
dc.subjectPatriarchyen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectIndigenousen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWashburn, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFatzinger, Amyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFox, Mary Joen_US
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