Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/265365
Title:
Health Care for Hawaiian Foster Children
Author:
Updike, Meghan
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Foster children represent a vulnerable pediatric population with complex health needs including both acute and chronic conditions that require comprehensive health care management. However, years of research has continually demonstrated a poor provision of health care services to this at risk population including gaps in preventative care and poor follow-up with specialty services. Current literature reveals that the health care management for foster children continues to be fragmented and subpar. Several health care delivery models, standards of care, and interventions have been recommended in an effort to improve the outcomes among foster children. However the perspective of foster parents, key caregivers, has been missing in current evidence. This investigation serves as a descriptive study utilizing grounded theory methodology to explore health care management from the Hawaii foster parent's perspective. The purpose of the investigation was two-fold: 1) to describe foster parents' experience obtaining health care for their foster children and 2) to elicit foster parents' opinions about whether or not a health education program designed for foster parents would be helpful. After completing seven individual interviews, which were analyzed using constant comparative analysis, 19 categories were developed describing the foster parent experience related to policy and services, social environment, physical environment, biology, and behavior. The concept of a medical home model was identified as unfeasible for Hawaii foster families, and large variations in health education preparation among foster parents was observed while a significant interest in further education on health-related topics was identified as a necessity. Implications for practice and recommendations for further research were also generated.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Nursing
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jones, Elaine G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHealth Care for Hawaiian Foster Childrenen_US
dc.creatorUpdike, Meghanen_US
dc.contributor.authorUpdike, Meghanen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFoster children represent a vulnerable pediatric population with complex health needs including both acute and chronic conditions that require comprehensive health care management. However, years of research has continually demonstrated a poor provision of health care services to this at risk population including gaps in preventative care and poor follow-up with specialty services. Current literature reveals that the health care management for foster children continues to be fragmented and subpar. Several health care delivery models, standards of care, and interventions have been recommended in an effort to improve the outcomes among foster children. However the perspective of foster parents, key caregivers, has been missing in current evidence. This investigation serves as a descriptive study utilizing grounded theory methodology to explore health care management from the Hawaii foster parent's perspective. The purpose of the investigation was two-fold: 1) to describe foster parents' experience obtaining health care for their foster children and 2) to elicit foster parents' opinions about whether or not a health education program designed for foster parents would be helpful. After completing seven individual interviews, which were analyzed using constant comparative analysis, 19 categories were developed describing the foster parent experience related to policy and services, social environment, physical environment, biology, and behavior. The concept of a medical home model was identified as unfeasible for Hawaii foster families, and large variations in health education preparation among foster parents was observed while a significant interest in further education on health-related topics was identified as a necessity. Implications for practice and recommendations for further research were also generated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectNursingen_US
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJones, Elaine G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMay, Kathleen M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreen, Roger A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en_US
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