The Role of Message Frame and Contact in Young Adults' Attitudes toward Older Adults and Social Security

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/265353
Title:
The Role of Message Frame and Contact in Young Adults' Attitudes toward Older Adults and Social Security
Author:
Springer, Sheila Ann
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Message framing and intergroup contact theories provide the framework for this study to examine how episodic and thematic political message frames affect young adults' attitudes toward older adults and Social Security. Three specific moderators were examined: direct contact, trait empathy, and critical consumption skills. Effects were explored experimentally using manipulated messages about abolishing Social Security. Results indicated that political message framing related to public policies does affect attitudes toward those policies. Respondents in the episodic condition reported significantly more negative attitudes toward Social Security than respondents in the thematic and control conditions. A significant effect on individual attribution of responsibility was also found such that respondents in the thematic condition rated individual responsibility significantly lower than respondents in the atypical condition. The study extends previous work by examining both intended and unintended attitudinal consequences of message frames.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Episodic and thematic frames; Political messages; Communication; Attitudes toward aging; Contact theory
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Harwood, Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Message Frame and Contact in Young Adults' Attitudes toward Older Adults and Social Securityen_US
dc.creatorSpringer, Sheila Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpringer, Sheila Annen_US
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMessage framing and intergroup contact theories provide the framework for this study to examine how episodic and thematic political message frames affect young adults' attitudes toward older adults and Social Security. Three specific moderators were examined: direct contact, trait empathy, and critical consumption skills. Effects were explored experimentally using manipulated messages about abolishing Social Security. Results indicated that political message framing related to public policies does affect attitudes toward those policies. Respondents in the episodic condition reported significantly more negative attitudes toward Social Security than respondents in the thematic and control conditions. A significant effect on individual attribution of responsibility was also found such that respondents in the thematic condition rated individual responsibility significantly lower than respondents in the atypical condition. The study extends previous work by examining both intended and unintended attitudinal consequences of message frames.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectEpisodic and thematic framesen_US
dc.subjectPolitical messagesen_US
dc.subjectCommunicationen_US
dc.subjectAttitudes toward agingen_US
dc.subjectContact theoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHarwood, Jakeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKenski, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRains, Steveen_US
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