Delta-deuterium and delta-oxygen-18 in mixed conifer systems in the United States southwest: The potential of delta-oxygen-18 in Pinus ponderosa tree rings as a natural environmental recorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/263512
Title:
Delta-deuterium and delta-oxygen-18 in mixed conifer systems in the United States southwest: The potential of delta-oxygen-18 in Pinus ponderosa tree rings as a natural environmental recorder
Author:
Wright, William Edward
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The North American Monsoon provides half of the annual precipitation in Tucson, Arizona. The other half occurs dominantly during the winter and early spring. Late spring is the transitional period to the monsoon and is characterized by high temperatures and low humidity. The reliability of this hyperarid period, the consistency of the timing of monsoon onset, and the recognition that certain high-elevation trees produce annual false latewood bands in response to this transitional period, were critical to the design of this dissertation research. I hypothesized that subannual environmental signals might be fixed in stable oxygen isotopes in cellulose from such trees. Existence of a long-term dataset of deltaD and delta18O from Tucson precipitation provided impetus for the collection of a companion dataset at a high-elevation site in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. Trees were sampled near the precipitation collection site. The relations between the stable isotope ratios in the precipitation and in the tree cellulose were identified through extraction of water from bimonthly samples of nearby soil, tree stems and needles. Spatial consistency of the cellulose stable isotope signals was measured using tree samples from seven additional sites across the U.S. desert Southwest. Correlations between Tucson summer precipitation delta18O and both local and extra-regional environmental parameters resulted in the identification of the dominant monsoonal moisture source for the Tucson area. Similar correlations with the cellulose delta18O timeseries from the post-false latewood cellulose, supported the previous interpretations, and suggest long-term reconstructions may be possible. Correlations between the earliest cellulose delta18O division and extra-regional environmental parameters suggest environmental measures may be reconstructable for the cool season. Comparison of the high and low elevation precipitation deltaD and delta18O datasets yielded many baseline measures of precipitation stable-isotope dynamics in the U.S. desert Southwest. Comparison of the high-elevation precipitation stable isotope record with soil and stem water deltaD and delta 18O from nearby confirmed that local trees were using dominantly deeper soil water. I noted correlations between measured needle-water stable isotope values and values calculated using a leaf-water model, but systematic departures suggest an additional unmodeled process may operate in this system.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Environmental Sciences.; Biology, Plant Physiology.; Geochemistry.; Earth Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leavitt, Steven W.
Committee Chair:
Leavitt, Steven W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDelta-deuterium and delta-oxygen-18 in mixed conifer systems in the United States southwest: The potential of delta-oxygen-18 in Pinus ponderosa tree rings as a natural environmental recorderen_US
dc.creatorWright, William Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, William Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe North American Monsoon provides half of the annual precipitation in Tucson, Arizona. The other half occurs dominantly during the winter and early spring. Late spring is the transitional period to the monsoon and is characterized by high temperatures and low humidity. The reliability of this hyperarid period, the consistency of the timing of monsoon onset, and the recognition that certain high-elevation trees produce annual false latewood bands in response to this transitional period, were critical to the design of this dissertation research. I hypothesized that subannual environmental signals might be fixed in stable oxygen isotopes in cellulose from such trees. Existence of a long-term dataset of deltaD and delta18O from Tucson precipitation provided impetus for the collection of a companion dataset at a high-elevation site in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. Trees were sampled near the precipitation collection site. The relations between the stable isotope ratios in the precipitation and in the tree cellulose were identified through extraction of water from bimonthly samples of nearby soil, tree stems and needles. Spatial consistency of the cellulose stable isotope signals was measured using tree samples from seven additional sites across the U.S. desert Southwest. Correlations between Tucson summer precipitation delta18O and both local and extra-regional environmental parameters resulted in the identification of the dominant monsoonal moisture source for the Tucson area. Similar correlations with the cellulose delta18O timeseries from the post-false latewood cellulose, supported the previous interpretations, and suggest long-term reconstructions may be possible. Correlations between the earliest cellulose delta18O division and extra-regional environmental parameters suggest environmental measures may be reconstructable for the cool season. Comparison of the high and low elevation precipitation deltaD and delta18O datasets yielded many baseline measures of precipitation stable-isotope dynamics in the U.S. desert Southwest. Comparison of the high-elevation precipitation stable isotope record with soil and stem water deltaD and delta 18O from nearby confirmed that local trees were using dominantly deeper soil water. I noted correlations between measured needle-water stable isotope values and values calculated using a leaf-water model, but systematic departures suggest an additional unmodeled process may operate in this system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Plant Physiology.en_US
dc.subjectGeochemistry.en_US
dc.subjectEarth Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeavitt, Steven W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairLeavitt, Steven W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeavitt, Steven W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLong, Austinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHughes, Malcolm K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeko, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, David G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016480-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.