Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262640
Title:
Tree-Ring Dating of the Karr-Koussevitzky Double Bass: A Case Study in Dendromusicology
Author:
Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.; DeWeese, Georgina G.; Williams, Dustin A.
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Science, Department of Geography, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996; Williams Fine Violins & Luthier Studios, Nashville, Tennessee 37212
Citation:
Grissino-Mayer, H.D., DeWeese, G.G., Williams, D.A. 2005. Research report: Tree-ring dating of the Karr-Koussevitzky double bass: A case study in dendromusicology. Tree-Ring Research 61(2):77-86.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262640
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org
Abstract:
Sergei Koussevitzky was one of the world’s premier conductors and virtuoso bass players whose favorite instrument was an unusually-shaped bass reportedly made in 1611 by the Amati brothers, Antonio and Girolamo. In 1962, 11 years after Koussevitzky’s death, his widow gave the bass to Gary Karr, currently considered to be the world’s premier double bassist. In 2004, Karr donated the bass to the International Society of Bassists. Close inspection by a team of experts in 2004, however, revealed stylistic inconsistencies that suggested a later construction date. We used four reference tree-ring chronologies developed from treeline species in the European Alpine region to anchor the dates for the tree rings from the double bass absolutely in time. The bass yielded a 317-year long sequence, the longest sequence yet developed from a single musical instrument. Statistical and graphical comparisons revealed that the bass has tree rings that date from 1445 to 1761. Based on the strength of these correlations, the spruce tree harvested to eventually construct the double bass likely came from the treeline Alpine area of western Austria, not too far from Obergurgl at the Italian border. Our results demonstrate that the double bass was not made by the Amati Brothers, but likely by French luthiers in the late 18th Century.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Dendromusicology; Musical Instruments; Double Bass; Sergei Koussevitzky; Gary Karr
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrissino-Mayer, Henri D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDeWeese, Georgina G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Dustin A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-14T00:13:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-14T00:13:51Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationGrissino-Mayer, H.D., DeWeese, G.G., Williams, D.A. 2005. Research report: Tree-ring dating of the Karr-Koussevitzky double bass: A case study in dendromusicology. Tree-Ring Research 61(2):77-86.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262640-
dc.description.abstractSergei Koussevitzky was one of the world’s premier conductors and virtuoso bass players whose favorite instrument was an unusually-shaped bass reportedly made in 1611 by the Amati brothers, Antonio and Girolamo. In 1962, 11 years after Koussevitzky’s death, his widow gave the bass to Gary Karr, currently considered to be the world’s premier double bassist. In 2004, Karr donated the bass to the International Society of Bassists. Close inspection by a team of experts in 2004, however, revealed stylistic inconsistencies that suggested a later construction date. We used four reference tree-ring chronologies developed from treeline species in the European Alpine region to anchor the dates for the tree rings from the double bass absolutely in time. The bass yielded a 317-year long sequence, the longest sequence yet developed from a single musical instrument. Statistical and graphical comparisons revealed that the bass has tree rings that date from 1445 to 1761. Based on the strength of these correlations, the spruce tree harvested to eventually construct the double bass likely came from the treeline Alpine area of western Austria, not too far from Obergurgl at the Italian border. Our results demonstrate that the double bass was not made by the Amati Brothers, but likely by French luthiers in the late 18th Century.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectDendromusicologyen_US
dc.subjectMusical Instrumentsen_US
dc.subjectDouble Bassen_US
dc.subjectSergei Koussevitzkyen_US
dc.subjectGary Karren_US
dc.titleTree-Ring Dating of the Karr-Koussevitzky Double Bass: A Case Study in Dendromusicologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Science, Department of Geography, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996en_US
dc.contributor.departmentWilliams Fine Violins & Luthier Studios, Nashville, Tennessee 37212en_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
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