Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262637
Title:
Seasonal Growth Characteristics of Kauri
Author:
Fowler, Anthony; Lorrey, Andrew; Crossley, Peter
Affiliation:
The University of Auckland, School of Geography and Environmental Science, Auckland, New Zealand
Citation:
Fowler, A., Lorrey, A., Crossley, P. 2005. Seasonal growth characteristics of Kauri. Tree-Ring Research 61(1):3-19.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262637
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org
Abstract:
Considerable research has occurred in recent years to build Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindley (kauri) tree-ring chronologies for paleoclimate applications and to identify statistical relationships between kauri tree rings and climate. This paper reports on a multi-year study of the seasonal growth of kauri, designed to assist in the interpretation of identified statistical relationships, and to determine if kauri’s seasonal growth characteristics are dependent on tree size. To achieve this, 43 kauri (0.09-2.00 m diameter) at Huapai Scientific Reserve were fitted with vernier bands to measure circumference change over 3-4 growing seasons. Absolute (mm) and relative (proportion of total ring) monthly growth rates were calculated for each tree and statistics characterizing the timing of growth were calculated (e.g. date corresponding to 50% of growth). Tree size-related differences were assessed by splitting the data into three subsets based on size, then comparing the monthly growth rates and growth timing statistics for the subsets. The growth timing statistics were also correlated with tree diameter. A key finding is the strong dominance of spring growth, with October and November alone accounting for 38-50% of the total ring width. This result is consistent across age cohorts, although the largest trees tended to peak in November, rather than October. This indicates that kauri tree rings are likely to have value in terms of reconstructing spring conditions; consistent with reported statistical relationships between kauri tree rings and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. High inter-tree variance in growth rates characterized the results, but little of this variance was accounted for by tree size. Although relationships between tree size and growth characteristics were generally weak and inconsistent, they are considered sufficient to warrant a precautionary approach in the development of tree-ring chronologies for climate reconstruction purposes.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Dendrometer Bands; Kauri; Agathis Australis; New Zealand
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLorrey, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrossley, Peteren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T23:40:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-13T23:40:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationFowler, A., Lorrey, A., Crossley, P. 2005. Seasonal growth characteristics of Kauri. Tree-Ring Research 61(1):3-19.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262637-
dc.description.abstractConsiderable research has occurred in recent years to build Agathis australis (D. Don) Lindley (kauri) tree-ring chronologies for paleoclimate applications and to identify statistical relationships between kauri tree rings and climate. This paper reports on a multi-year study of the seasonal growth of kauri, designed to assist in the interpretation of identified statistical relationships, and to determine if kauri’s seasonal growth characteristics are dependent on tree size. To achieve this, 43 kauri (0.09-2.00 m diameter) at Huapai Scientific Reserve were fitted with vernier bands to measure circumference change over 3-4 growing seasons. Absolute (mm) and relative (proportion of total ring) monthly growth rates were calculated for each tree and statistics characterizing the timing of growth were calculated (e.g. date corresponding to 50% of growth). Tree size-related differences were assessed by splitting the data into three subsets based on size, then comparing the monthly growth rates and growth timing statistics for the subsets. The growth timing statistics were also correlated with tree diameter. A key finding is the strong dominance of spring growth, with October and November alone accounting for 38-50% of the total ring width. This result is consistent across age cohorts, although the largest trees tended to peak in November, rather than October. This indicates that kauri tree rings are likely to have value in terms of reconstructing spring conditions; consistent with reported statistical relationships between kauri tree rings and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. High inter-tree variance in growth rates characterized the results, but little of this variance was accounted for by tree size. Although relationships between tree size and growth characteristics were generally weak and inconsistent, they are considered sufficient to warrant a precautionary approach in the development of tree-ring chronologies for climate reconstruction purposes.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectDendrometer Bandsen_US
dc.subjectKaurien_US
dc.subjectAgathis Australisen_US
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_US
dc.titleSeasonal Growth Characteristics of Kaurien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Auckland, School of Geography and Environmental Science, Auckland, New Zealanden_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.