Dendroglaciological Evidence for a Neoglacial Advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262633
Title:
Dendroglaciological Evidence for a Neoglacial Advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains
Author:
Wood, Chris; Smith, Dan
Affiliation:
University of Victoria Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P5, Canada
Citation:
Wood, C., Smith, D. 2004. Dendroglaciological evidence for a Neoglacial advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Tree-Ring Research 60(1):59-65.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262633
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org
Abstract:
Seventeen glacially sheared stumps in growth position and abundant detrital wood fragments were exposed by stream avulsion at the terminus of the Saskatchewan Glacier in 1999. The stumps lay buried beneath the glacier and over 5 m of glacial sediment until historical recession and stream incision exposed the 225- to 262-year-old stand of subalpine fir, Englemann spruce and whitebark pine trees. Crossdating and construction of two radiocarbon-controlled floating tree-ring chronologies showed that all the subfossil stumps and boles exposed at this location were killed during a Neoglacial advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier 2,910 ± 60 to 2,730 ± 60 ¹⁴C years B.P. These findings support the Peyto Advance as a regional glaciological response to changing mass balance conditions.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Dendroglaciology; Floating Chronology; Saskatchewan Glacier; Peyto Advance; Canadian Rocky Mountains
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWood, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Danen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T23:34:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-13T23:34:20Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationWood, C., Smith, D. 2004. Dendroglaciological evidence for a Neoglacial advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountains. Tree-Ring Research 60(1):59-65.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262633-
dc.description.abstractSeventeen glacially sheared stumps in growth position and abundant detrital wood fragments were exposed by stream avulsion at the terminus of the Saskatchewan Glacier in 1999. The stumps lay buried beneath the glacier and over 5 m of glacial sediment until historical recession and stream incision exposed the 225- to 262-year-old stand of subalpine fir, Englemann spruce and whitebark pine trees. Crossdating and construction of two radiocarbon-controlled floating tree-ring chronologies showed that all the subfossil stumps and boles exposed at this location were killed during a Neoglacial advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier 2,910 ± 60 to 2,730 ± 60 ¹⁴C years B.P. These findings support the Peyto Advance as a regional glaciological response to changing mass balance conditions.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectDendroglaciologyen_US
dc.subjectFloating Chronologyen_US
dc.subjectSaskatchewan Glacieren_US
dc.subjectPeyto Advanceen_US
dc.subjectCanadian Rocky Mountainsen_US
dc.titleDendroglaciological Evidence for a Neoglacial Advance of the Saskatchewan Glacier, Banff National Park, Canadian Rocky Mountainsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Victoria Tree-Ring Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3P5, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
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