Decoupling Tree-Ring Signatures of Climate Variation, Fire, and Insect Outbreaks in Central Oregon

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262623
Title:
Decoupling Tree-Ring Signatures of Climate Variation, Fire, and Insect Outbreaks in Central Oregon
Author:
Pohl, Kelly A.; Hadley, Keith S.; Arabas, Karen B.
Affiliation:
Department of Geography, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97207; Department of Environmental and Earch Sciences, Willamette University, Salem, OR 97301
Citation:
Pohl, K.A., Hadley, K.S., Arabas, K.B. 2006. Decoupling tree-ring signatures of climate variation, fire, and insect outbreaks in central Oregon. Tree-Ring Research 62(2):37-50.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262623
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org
Abstract:
Dendroecological methods play a critical role in developing our understanding of forest processes by contributing historical evidence of climate variability and the temporal characteristics of disturbance. We seek to contribute to these methods by developing a research protocol for decoupling radial-growth signatures related to climate, fire, and insect outbreaks in central Oregon. Our methods are based on three independent, crossdated tree-ring data sets: 1) a 545-year tree-ring climate reconstruction, 2) a 550-year fire history, and 3) a 250-year pandora moth outbreak history derived from host (Pinus ponderosa) and non-host (Abies grandis-Abies concolor) tree-ring chronologies. Based on these data, we use visual criteria (marker and signature rings), statistical comparisons, and Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) to identify the timing of growth anomalies and establish the temporal relationships between drought, climate variation (ENSO and PDO), fire events, and pandora moth (Coloradia pandora) outbreaks. Our results show pandora moth outbreaks generally coincide with periods of below-average moisture, whereas fire in central Oregon often follows a period of wetter than average conditions. Fire events in central Oregon appear to be related to shifts in hemispheric climate variability but the relationship between fire and pandora moth outbreaks remains unclear.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Dendroecology; Disturbance Interactions; Pandora Moth; Insect; Disturbance; Newberry National Volcanic Monument
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPohl, Kelly A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHadley, Keith S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArabas, Karen B.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-14T00:22:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-14T00:22:55Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationPohl, K.A., Hadley, K.S., Arabas, K.B. 2006. Decoupling tree-ring signatures of climate variation, fire, and insect outbreaks in central Oregon. Tree-Ring Research 62(2):37-50.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262623-
dc.description.abstractDendroecological methods play a critical role in developing our understanding of forest processes by contributing historical evidence of climate variability and the temporal characteristics of disturbance. We seek to contribute to these methods by developing a research protocol for decoupling radial-growth signatures related to climate, fire, and insect outbreaks in central Oregon. Our methods are based on three independent, crossdated tree-ring data sets: 1) a 545-year tree-ring climate reconstruction, 2) a 550-year fire history, and 3) a 250-year pandora moth outbreak history derived from host (Pinus ponderosa) and non-host (Abies grandis-Abies concolor) tree-ring chronologies. Based on these data, we use visual criteria (marker and signature rings), statistical comparisons, and Superposed Epoch Analysis (SEA) to identify the timing of growth anomalies and establish the temporal relationships between drought, climate variation (ENSO and PDO), fire events, and pandora moth (Coloradia pandora) outbreaks. Our results show pandora moth outbreaks generally coincide with periods of below-average moisture, whereas fire in central Oregon often follows a period of wetter than average conditions. Fire events in central Oregon appear to be related to shifts in hemispheric climate variability but the relationship between fire and pandora moth outbreaks remains unclear.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectDendroecologyen_US
dc.subjectDisturbance Interactionsen_US
dc.subjectPandora Mothen_US
dc.subjectInsecten_US
dc.subjectDisturbanceen_US
dc.subjectNewberry National Volcanic Monumenten_US
dc.titleDecoupling Tree-Ring Signatures of Climate Variation, Fire, and Insect Outbreaks in Central Oregonen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geography, Portland State University, Portland, OR 97207en_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Environmental and Earch Sciences, Willamette University, Salem, OR 97301en_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
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