Dendroclimatic Analysis of White Spruce at its Southern Limit of Distribution in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park, Manitoba, Canada

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262614
Title:
Dendroclimatic Analysis of White Spruce at its Southern Limit of Distribution in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park, Manitoba, Canada
Author:
Chhin, Sophan; Wang, G. Geoff; Tardif, Jacques
Affiliation:
Centre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research (C-FIR), University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 2E9
Citation:
Chhin, S., Wang, G.G., Tardif, J. 2004. Dendroclimatic analysis of white spruce at its southern limit of distribution in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park, Manitoba, Canada. Tree-Ring Research 60(1):31-43.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262614
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org
Abstract:
We examined the radial growth - climate association of a disjunct population of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) at its southern limit of distribution. Forty-four white spruce tree islands were sampled over four mixed-grass prairie preserves in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park located in the forestprairie boundary of southwestern Manitoba. Reduced radial growth occurred during the 1910s, 1930s, early 1960s, and the late 1970s to the early 1980s and corresponded to periods of drought on the Canadian prairies, and the Great Plains of the United States. Correlation and response function coefficients indicated that conditions in the summer and fall of the previous year (t-1), and the summer of the current year (t) strongly influenced white spruce growth. Growth was positively correlated with August-September (t-1) and May-June-July (t) precipitation and moisture index (precipitation minus potential evapotranspiration). Radial growth was positively associated with June-July-August (t) river discharge. Growth was most correlated with maximum and mean temperature compared with minimum temperature. Precipitation and maximum temperature accounted for the greatest variation in radial growth (61%). The results suggest that white spruce growth is sensitive to climatic fluctuations because growth is restricted by moisture deficiency exacerbated by temperature-induced drought stress.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Aspen Parkland; Climate Change; Dendroclimatology; Drought Stress; Mixed-Grass Prairie; Picea Glauca (Moench) Voss; Prairie-Forest Boundary; Response Function
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChhin, Sophanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, G. Geoffen_US
dc.contributor.authorTardif, Jacquesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T23:25:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-13T23:25:30Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationChhin, S., Wang, G.G., Tardif, J. 2004. Dendroclimatic analysis of white spruce at its southern limit of distribution in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park, Manitoba, Canada. Tree-Ring Research 60(1):31-43.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262614-
dc.description.abstractWe examined the radial growth - climate association of a disjunct population of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) at its southern limit of distribution. Forty-four white spruce tree islands were sampled over four mixed-grass prairie preserves in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park located in the forestprairie boundary of southwestern Manitoba. Reduced radial growth occurred during the 1910s, 1930s, early 1960s, and the late 1970s to the early 1980s and corresponded to periods of drought on the Canadian prairies, and the Great Plains of the United States. Correlation and response function coefficients indicated that conditions in the summer and fall of the previous year (t-1), and the summer of the current year (t) strongly influenced white spruce growth. Growth was positively correlated with August-September (t-1) and May-June-July (t) precipitation and moisture index (precipitation minus potential evapotranspiration). Radial growth was positively associated with June-July-August (t) river discharge. Growth was most correlated with maximum and mean temperature compared with minimum temperature. Precipitation and maximum temperature accounted for the greatest variation in radial growth (61%). The results suggest that white spruce growth is sensitive to climatic fluctuations because growth is restricted by moisture deficiency exacerbated by temperature-induced drought stress.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectAspen Parklanden_US
dc.subjectClimate Changeen_US
dc.subjectDendroclimatologyen_US
dc.subjectDrought Stressen_US
dc.subjectMixed-Grass Prairieen_US
dc.subjectPicea Glauca (Moench) Vossen_US
dc.subjectPrairie-Forest Boundaryen_US
dc.subjectResponse Functionen_US
dc.titleDendroclimatic Analysis of White Spruce at its Southern Limit of Distribution in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park, Manitoba, Canadaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research (C-FIR), University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3B 2E9en_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
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