Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262557
Title:
Aegean Tree-Ring Signature Years Explained
Author:
Hughes, Malcolm K.; Kuniholm, Peter Ian; Eischeid, Jon K.; Garfin, Gregg; Griggs, Carol B.; Latini, Christine
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Malcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY; Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
Issue Date:
2001
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Hughes, M.K., Kuniholm, P.I., Eischeid, J.K., Garfin, G., Griggs, C.B., Latini, C. 2001. Aegean tree-ring signature years explained. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):67-73.
Abstract:
As a long master tree -ring chronology for the region around the Aegean approaches completion, timbers from monuments and archaeological sites as far as 2,000 km apart, and as far back as 7000 BC, are being dated. The patterns used in this dating are characterized by signature years, in which trees at the majority of the sites have smaller or broader rings than in the previous year. We show that the signature years are consistently associated with specific, persistent, circulation anomalies that control the access of precipitation- bearing systems to the region in springtime. This explains the feasibility of dating wooden objects from widely dispersed sites, and opens the possibility of reconstructing aspects of the climate in which the wood grew.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAegean Tree-Ring Signature Years Explaineden_US
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Malcolm K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKuniholm, Peter Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorEischeid, Jon K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarfin, Greggen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriggs, Carol B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLatini, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Research, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMalcolm and Carolyn Wiener Laboratory for Aegean and Near Eastern Dendrochronology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NYen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, COen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.identifier.citationHughes, M.K., Kuniholm, P.I., Eischeid, J.K., Garfin, G., Griggs, C.B., Latini, C. 2001. Aegean tree-ring signature years explained. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):67-73.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs a long master tree -ring chronology for the region around the Aegean approaches completion, timbers from monuments and archaeological sites as far as 2,000 km apart, and as far back as 7000 BC, are being dated. The patterns used in this dating are characterized by signature years, in which trees at the majority of the sites have smaller or broader rings than in the previous year. We show that the signature years are consistently associated with specific, persistent, circulation anomalies that control the access of precipitation- bearing systems to the region in springtime. This explains the feasibility of dating wooden objects from widely dispersed sites, and opens the possibility of reconstructing aspects of the climate in which the wood grew.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.identifier.citationHughes, M.K., Kuniholm, P.I., Eischeid, J.K., Garfin, G., Griggs, C.B., Latini, C. 2001. Aegean tree-ring signature years explained. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):67-73.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262557-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
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