Relationships Between Ring-Width Variation and Soil Nutrient Availability at the Tree Scale

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262537
Title:
Relationships Between Ring-Width Variation and Soil Nutrient Availability at the Tree Scale
Author:
Sheppard, Paul A.; Cassals, Pere; Gutiérrez, Emilia
Affiliation:
Department d'Ecologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, España; Department de Biologia Vegetal, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, España
Issue Date:
2001
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Research
Citation:
Sheppard, P.R., Casals, P., Gutiérrez, E. 2001. Relationships between ring-width variation and soil nutrient availability at the tree scale. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):105-113.
Abstract:
Within the framework of the linear aggregate model of dendrochronology, the potential role of soil nutrient availability in explaining multi-decadal variation in radial growth at the tree level was studied in the central Spanish Pyrenees. Increment cores were collected from 20 mature Pinus uncinata Ram. and analyzed dendrochronologically. One ion-exchange resin capsule was buried within the root zone of each sampled tree for just over eight months. The resins were chemically extracted and measured for NH₄, NO PO₄, Ca, and K. Statistical relationships between indexed tree growth and soil nutrient availability were determined with regression analysis and bivariate plots. The single most important soil nutrient with respect to decadal-scale dendrochronological tree-growth variables in this study was N in the form NO which explained 22% of variation of trend in growth since 1950. The 20 values of NO₃ availability fell into two subgroups, one of trees with relatively higher NO₃ availability and the other with lower NO₃ availability. When the tree-growth data were grouped based on NO₃ availability, the two resultant index chronologies had different low-frequency features since 1950. Trees with low NO₃ availability have been growing as expected based on past growth, but trees with high NO availability have been growing better than expected. Measuring and analyzing soil nutrient availability at the tree level might enhance environmental applications of dendrochronological research. With soils information at this spatial scale, it is possible to distinguish between subgroups of trees within a tree-ring site and thereby construct subchronologies that differ significantly, especially for variation at the decadal scale. Subsite-chronologies may then lead to different and presumably more informative environmental interpretations relative to those based on a full-site chronology.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings
ISSN:
2162-4585; 1536-1098
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelationships Between Ring-Width Variation and Soil Nutrient Availability at the Tree Scaleen_US
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Paul A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCassals, Pereen_US
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez, Emiliaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment d'Ecologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Españaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment de Biologia Vegetal, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Españaen_US
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.identifier.citationSheppard, P.R., Casals, P., Gutiérrez, E. 2001. Relationships between ring-width variation and soil nutrient availability at the tree scale. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):105-113.en_US
dc.description.abstractWithin the framework of the linear aggregate model of dendrochronology, the potential role of soil nutrient availability in explaining multi-decadal variation in radial growth at the tree level was studied in the central Spanish Pyrenees. Increment cores were collected from 20 mature Pinus uncinata Ram. and analyzed dendrochronologically. One ion-exchange resin capsule was buried within the root zone of each sampled tree for just over eight months. The resins were chemically extracted and measured for NH₄, NO PO₄, Ca, and K. Statistical relationships between indexed tree growth and soil nutrient availability were determined with regression analysis and bivariate plots. The single most important soil nutrient with respect to decadal-scale dendrochronological tree-growth variables in this study was N in the form NO which explained 22% of variation of trend in growth since 1950. The 20 values of NO₃ availability fell into two subgroups, one of trees with relatively higher NO₃ availability and the other with lower NO₃ availability. When the tree-growth data were grouped based on NO₃ availability, the two resultant index chronologies had different low-frequency features since 1950. Trees with low NO₃ availability have been growing as expected based on past growth, but trees with high NO availability have been growing better than expected. Measuring and analyzing soil nutrient availability at the tree level might enhance environmental applications of dendrochronological research. With soils information at this spatial scale, it is possible to distinguish between subgroups of trees within a tree-ring site and thereby construct subchronologies that differ significantly, especially for variation at the decadal scale. Subsite-chronologies may then lead to different and presumably more informative environmental interpretations relative to those based on a full-site chronology.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.identifier.citationSheppard, P.R., Casals, P., Gutiérrez, E. 2001. Relationships between ring-width variation and soil nutrient availability at the tree scale. Tree-Ring Research 57(1):105-113.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-4585-
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262537-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.