Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262532
Title:
Libocedrus Bidwillii Tree-Ring Chronologies in New Zealand
Author:
Xiong, Limin; Palmer, Jonathan G.
Affiliation:
Soil, Plant, and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand
Issue Date:
2000
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Bulletin
Citation:
Xiong, L., Palmer, J.G. 2000. Libocedrus bidwillii tree-ring chronologies in New Zealand. Tree-Ring Bulletin 56:1-16.
Abstract:
Twenty-three Libocedrus bidwillii (New Zealand cedar) tree-ring chronologies have been developed from New Zealand. This total consists of twelve new sites collected by the authors and eleven previously collected by others (five of which we have updated and six of which were not). Standardization of the tree-ring series from each site used a double detrending method (linear-exponential or linear regression or a horizontal detrending plus spline detrending fitted to 2/3 the length of each tree-ring series). ARSTAN modeling using the Aikaike Information Criterion (AIC) to determine the filter model removed all significant autocorrelations from the residual chronologies. The average chronology length is around 500 years, and the sites are spread over 8° of latitude (i.e.. 38°-46 °S) and nearly 10(X) m in elevation (i.e., 244-1220 m.a.s.1.). The species tends to grow slowly (mean ring-width 0.7 mm), and the tree rings have a high autocorrelation value (0.79). The average mean sensitivity was 0.17, and the average mean correlation between all radii within chronologies was 0.55. Comparison of the chronologies showed a highly consistent and significant pattern among most of the sites. There was a reduction in interchronology correlation with separation distance; however, there was no clear relationship, or an effect, due to elevation. The spatial extent and temporal length of the network of sites offers the most comprehensive opportunity for New Zealand climate reconstruction to date.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings
ISSN:
0041-2198
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLibocedrus Bidwillii Tree-Ring Chronologies in New Zealanden_US
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Liminen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Jonathan G.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSoil, Plant, and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealanden_US
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.identifier.citationXiong, L., Palmer, J.G. 2000. Libocedrus bidwillii tree-ring chronologies in New Zealand. Tree-Ring Bulletin 56:1-16.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwenty-three Libocedrus bidwillii (New Zealand cedar) tree-ring chronologies have been developed from New Zealand. This total consists of twelve new sites collected by the authors and eleven previously collected by others (five of which we have updated and six of which were not). Standardization of the tree-ring series from each site used a double detrending method (linear-exponential or linear regression or a horizontal detrending plus spline detrending fitted to 2/3 the length of each tree-ring series). ARSTAN modeling using the Aikaike Information Criterion (AIC) to determine the filter model removed all significant autocorrelations from the residual chronologies. The average chronology length is around 500 years, and the sites are spread over 8° of latitude (i.e.. 38°-46 °S) and nearly 10(X) m in elevation (i.e., 244-1220 m.a.s.1.). The species tends to grow slowly (mean ring-width 0.7 mm), and the tree rings have a high autocorrelation value (0.79). The average mean sensitivity was 0.17, and the average mean correlation between all radii within chronologies was 0.55. Comparison of the chronologies showed a highly consistent and significant pattern among most of the sites. There was a reduction in interchronology correlation with separation distance; however, there was no clear relationship, or an effect, due to elevation. The spatial extent and temporal length of the network of sites offers the most comprehensive opportunity for New Zealand climate reconstruction to date.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.identifier.citationXiong, L., Palmer, J.G. 2000. Libocedrus bidwillii tree-ring chronologies in New Zealand. Tree-Ring Bulletin 56:1-16.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0041-2198-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262532-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
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