Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/262370
Title:
The "Many Fragments Curse:" A Special Case of the Segment Length Curse
Author:
Sheppard, Paul R.; Holmes, Richard L.; Graumlich, Lisa J.
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
1997
Rights:
Copyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.
Publisher:
Tree-Ring Society
Journal:
Tree-Ring Bulletin
Citation:
Sheppard, P.R., Holmes, R.L., Graumlich, L.J. 1997. The "many fragments curse:" A special case of the segment length curse. Tree-Ring Bulletin 54:1-9.
Abstract:
The "many fragments curse," a special case of the segment length curse, occurs in den- drochronology when time series are broken into fragments, either because of missing part of a sample (e.g., a rot pocket) or when a section of ring growth cannot be crossdated (e.g., a section with extremely suppressed growth and/or many rings absent). We exorcise this curse by inserting values to connect fragments of measurements. This technique permits fitting a single detrending curve to the connected series and thus preserves the low-frequency variance contained in the entire series. Inserted values are discarded after detrending and do not otherwise affect calculations of final corn- posite chronologies. As an example from junipers sampled at a site in Qinghai Province, China, 66 of 117 increment cores have nondatable sections of wood and one core has a gap of rotten wood between dated fragments. After connecting fragments by inserting values and then detrending, the chronology constructed from connected fragments has stronger century to multicentury scale variation than the chronology constructed from separate fragments. This approach is adapted to the library of computer programs developed for dendrochronological research under the auspices of the International Tree-Ring Data Bank.
Keywords:
Dendrochronology; Tree Rings; Correction Factors; Growth Rings; Techniques
ISSN:
0041-2198
Additional Links:
http://www.treeringsociety.org

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe "Many Fragments Curse:" A Special Case of the Segment Length Curseen_US
dc.contributor.authorSheppard, Paul R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, Richard L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGraumlich, Lisa J.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Tree-Ring Research, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.rightsCopyright © Tree-Ring Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Tree-Ring Research (formerly Tree-Ring Bulletin) archive. It was digitized from a physical copy provided by the Laboratory of Tree-Ring research at The University of Arizona. For more information about this peer-reviewed scholarly journal, please email the Editor of Tree-Ring Research at editor@treeringsociety.org.en_US
dc.publisherTree-Ring Societyen_US
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.identifier.citationSheppard, P.R., Holmes, R.L., Graumlich, L.J. 1997. The "many fragments curse:" A special case of the segment length curse. Tree-Ring Bulletin 54:1-9.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe "many fragments curse," a special case of the segment length curse, occurs in den- drochronology when time series are broken into fragments, either because of missing part of a sample (e.g., a rot pocket) or when a section of ring growth cannot be crossdated (e.g., a section with extremely suppressed growth and/or many rings absent). We exorcise this curse by inserting values to connect fragments of measurements. This technique permits fitting a single detrending curve to the connected series and thus preserves the low-frequency variance contained in the entire series. Inserted values are discarded after detrending and do not otherwise affect calculations of final corn- posite chronologies. As an example from junipers sampled at a site in Qinghai Province, China, 66 of 117 increment cores have nondatable sections of wood and one core has a gap of rotten wood between dated fragments. After connecting fragments by inserting values and then detrending, the chronology constructed from connected fragments has stronger century to multicentury scale variation than the chronology constructed from separate fragments. This approach is adapted to the library of computer programs developed for dendrochronological research under the auspices of the International Tree-Ring Data Bank.en_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.subjectCorrection Factorsen_US
dc.subjectGrowth Ringsen_US
dc.subjectTechniquesen_US
dc.identifier.citationSheppard, P.R., Holmes, R.L., Graumlich, L.J. 1997. The "many fragments curse:" A special case of the segment length curse. Tree-Ring Bulletin 54:1-9.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0041-2198-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/262370-
dc.identifier.journalTree-Ring Bulletinen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.treeringsociety.orgen_US
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